The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Marquis Wheat:

davidg618's picture
davidg618

Marquis Wheat:

Postal Grunt's picture
Postal Grunt

Heartland Mill in Marienthal, KS has been selling and shipping Turkey Red wheat flour for several years. The wheat is grown locally. Most of it is sold in commercial quantities to bakeries across the country but it can be purchased in consumer quantities if you're willing to pay the shipping costs.

http://www.heartlandmill.com/

 

 

davidg618's picture
davidg618

Thanks for the info.  I"ll take a look.

David G

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

first wheat variety planted in Canada in the later part of te 1800's  and it reigned supreme for many years.  Marquis was the the first hybrid, talked about in the article, that wiped Red Fife out if he planting fields in Canada in the early 1900's.  Other hybrids of Marquis had since supplanted Marquis,  this workhorse of wheat in the Northern climes.  Hopefully we will be able to get our hands on some to make bread in a fes years.  It is nice to see folks just like Gary Zimmernman here at Hayden Mills in Tempe, who are trying to bring back the grains of the past for local production and flour making,/  Especially if the hybrids derived from the older grains were not based on taste and nutrition and based in quantity over quality of yields.  As a home na=baker I ant taste and nutrition over an extra 20 bushels per acre

Nice post!..

davidg618's picture
davidg618

Hi brown man,

I've been posting infrequently this past year. I'm still baking as often and as much, but I'm not doing anything different except an occasional tweak.  A bit more than a year ago I realized I'd reached my modest goals: a repertoire of bread formulae that fill our day-to-day needs/likings, and the skills and discipline to produce them consistently.

I've shifted my foodie focus to another tasty domain: Charcuterie.

None the less I still visit TFL frequently, and surf other food blogs. My wife forwarded the above article to me, and I thought other TFL'ers might be interested, especially those that grind their own flours.

Over the past two or three days I keep thinking about the article. I've developed an itch to know more about the history of wheat--modern and ancient. I searched Amazon, but my ignorance is too high to make a good book choice.

Can you suggest some titles? I want to focus on wheat; perhaps I'll develop a similar itch for other grains later. I'm interested in two disjoint categories: The genetic evolution of wheat, both natural and man-made; and anecdotal geo-political influences of wheat and wheat products.

I was in Bulgaria in 1996 and witnessed the agitation of its citizens when they learned the new government had sold the nation's wheat reserves. Tensions were high, and after returning home I heard the offending government party was later unseated early primarily over this issue. Since then I've learned bread has been a political "tool" for millennia, but I only know of a few examples--"Bread and circuses" and "Let them eat Cake"--I'm certain there are many more.

David G

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

What I do is search the net for the history of such things starting with Wikipedia which has footnotes and links to the their sources,  If you type in Marquis wheat into google search you will get page after page of articles about it.  Same with Red Fife or any other subject it seems!  A great resource and tool for sure.  Everything the world knows is online today it seems - and most of it is free.

Same with Charcuterie.

It is a great way to learn something worthwhile.... while staying busy.

AnarchyAcres's picture
AnarchyAcres

We have Marquis flour and whole berries for sale at http://www.anarchyacres.com/marquis.  Our 2016 crop, grown in Wisconsin, was excellent.  First loaf of Wisconsin Grown Marquis wheat since WWII!