The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Kamut off tasting pre-ground vs fresh ground

artistta's picture
artistta

Kamut off tasting pre-ground vs fresh ground

Do any of you grind your own Kamut (specifically that brand, not just khorasan wheat)? I'm curious if you've tried grinding your own flour and then also purchasing pre-ground flour from Kamut. I'm curious because I've for years ground my own Kamut. It's the primary grain I use in my home bread business. However, my orders have surpassed what I am willing to grind myself. Last time it took me two days to grind the flour. Too much effort, mess and issues with my lungs to be willing to keep doing that. I went ahead and ordered pre-ground Kamut directly from the Montana milling company. I just am making my first round of breads and the flour has a very different smell, taste to it than what I've come to know for years. It's kind of grassy, a bit on the bitter side. I cooked a small amount of dough in the pan to see what flavor it would have and most of that grassiness goes away, but after years of tasting this flour I can certainly still tell a difference. The bags have a date (I think it's the date at least) of being packaged last November. Not ideal, but that isn't necessarily crazy old for flour. Have I just been spoiled with fresh ground???? I'm not sure what to do. I have 250lbs of this flour and I'm not sure what my customers will think. I'm sure the sourdough culture will mask some of the flavor once it's had time to ferment, but maybe not. 

Anyone have thoughts??? 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

store bought kamut and can't ever remember it tasting grassy or bitter.   I know what you mean by that taste too.  

Call the mill and ask about it, perhaps they have given you the wrong grain with your order.  I would certainly let them know you are not happy with the order.   You might not be the only one disappointed.   Perhaps they have a solution.

artistta's picture
artistta

I just tried calling the company and their number is not working for me. Not sure what is up. I will email them. I just had my kids try some dough and they didn't want to eat it. That is completely NOT like my kids. They love fresh dough. I did try a pinch of just the flour on my tongue and it's terrible tasting. Something is not right. How discouraging. I have an event I sell bread at this Saturday and already have orders to be making. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and color.  It would be near impossible to not know it when you seed it but 6 month old Kamut flour might be a bit more difficult after oxidizing all those months.  You can never ever duplicate the taste, flavor and texture of fresh milled flour with any flour that is 6 months old.

There is no telling what the miller took out of the flour you have but likely all the germ and much of the bran is missing and it certainly isn't fresh.  Yo have spoiled yourself with the best Kamut flour in the world and there is no way to duplicate it by buying Kamut Flour from the mill unless it is whole grain and you pick it up the day it is milled and use it right away - just like you were milling it at home. 

Folks who have never used fresh milled whole grain flour do not know how huge the difference in taste, flavor and aroma is - but we know it is huge.

Wish there was a better answer for you bit what you need is a bigger mill that mills faster but if you are sifting then it won't help much.

artistta's picture
artistta

You are totally right. My customers have been spoiled with fresh ground flour. If I could afford a different grinder I'd keep trying to do it, but I would have to greatly increase my prices (my loaves are $7-$11 now). I am on my second grinder (nutrimill) and it's just not meant to grind as much flour as I'm needing now (100-150 lb range at a time). Plus, grinding Kamut seems to be much harder than other wheats on the grinder. 

The flour I have is whole grain. I have purchased ground, whole grain Kamut from Azure Standard before, just to test the grind texture on it and it's flavor was nothing like this. This flour is almost not palatable. 

Jame-L's picture
Jame-L

Greetings from Montana! As the North American Regional Director for Kamut International, I'm very sorry to learn that you have had an unpleasant experience with KAMUT(R) wheat flour. I'd be pleased to correspond with you about this issue at jamie.lockman@kamut.com 


KAMUT® Brand khorasan is an organic, non-genetically modified, ancient wheat variety similar to durum. In 1990, “KAMUT” was registered as a trademark by the Quinn family in order to support organic farming and preserve the ancient khorasan wheat variety. Under the KAMUT® Brand name, this khorasan wheat must always be grown organically, never be hybridized or modified, and contain high levels of purity and nutrition. Today, Kamut International owns and has registered the KAMUT® trademark in over 40 countries, and is responsible for the protection and marketing of all KAMUT® Brand khorasan wheat throughout the world.

Kamut International promotes and protects the KAMUT® brand name by focusing efforts on supply chain integrity, trademark monitoring, research, education, marketing, and customer relations. These activities are supported in part, through a no-cost trademark license agreement with companies using the grain in products they manufacture and /or sell. The trademark license agreement facilitates establishing a supply chain that can be reviewed, thus ensuring the integrity and purity of the grain.

KAMUT® wheat is grown on dryland certified organic farms primarily in Montana, Alberta, and Saskatchewan. Khorasan wheat is distinctive because it is about two and half times larger than regular durum wheat, is elongated with a pronounced “hump,” and is uniquely vitreous, with a rich golden color. The grain is prized by consumers who appreciate the grain for its high energy nutrition, easy digestibility, nutty/buttery taste, and firm texture. KAMUT® khorasan wheat is higher in protein, lipids, selenium, amino acids, and Vitamin E than most modern wheat and contains essential minerals such as magnesium and zinc. It is used as whole grain berries, whole grain flour, white flour, flakes, and puffs to make a variety of products. Some specific benefits of using KAMUT® khorasan are receiving more nutrients, protein, and taste than most commonly consumed whole wheat - plus supporting organic agriculture and helping to preserve an ancient grain.

Jamie Ryan Lockman | Regional Director – North America
Kamut International, Ltd.
P.O. Box 4903 | Missoula, MT 59806 | USA
406.251.9418 phone | 406.251.9420 fax
jamie.lockman@kamut.com | www.kamut.com

 

http://www.visitmt.com/ 

 

artistta's picture
artistta

Hi Jamie, 

Thank you for the information. I was able to get through via email yesterday and heard from a Leann. She needed to speak to her boss. Pictures of the bags (lot number, etc) have been sent to her. She let me know that a storm had gone through the night before and the phones were not working properly and that is why I couldn't reach you all via phone. 

I love Kamut. I've been using it as my main flour for probably about 5 years now and it's the primary go to flour for my small, but growing artisan, ancient grain, sourdough bread business. In taste test I have done with customers between einkorn, Kamut, emmer, spelt, modern wheat, both Kamut and einkorn always win out. 

I have never had flour with this type of flavor before, which is why I have been so confused. I had my husband try some last night and he agreed that it has a sour, grass like flavor to it. I can still taste the traditional Kamut flavor, but this other flavor is overpower the sweet, freshness that I love about Kamut. I will wait to hear more from Leann. 

Thank you! Therese

artistta's picture
artistta

Just incase anyone reads this in the future. Things have been sorted out with Montana Flour Company and the Kamut flour. The owner gave me a call and was very sorry for the issue with the flour. They are sending me 5 new bags. They stand behind their product and I will continue to use it. I love it and it truly does make delicious breads. 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

and a great relief.  I had been wondering how things came out and glad to know you can keep making quality breads.  

Mini