The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sandwich bread collapse

debmc's picture
debmc

Sandwich bread collapse

Hello Fellow Bread Bakers, many times by the time I get to the middle of the loaf it will begin to crumble when I cut it.  Could it be its rising to much, should I roll it tighter, is it drying out to quickly?  Any suggestions would be helpful, Deb

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

What kind of flour are you using? And what method are you using to develop the gluten (kneading, stretch & fold, overnight bulk ferment, same day make and bake with lots of yeast)? When we were recently in Mexico I found the bread to have the same characteristics, even when it was purchased fresh at a market (and it LOOKED like nice artisan loaves). I suspect their flour is very soft and there just wasn't enough gluten to develop a strong structure for the crumb.

debmc's picture
debmc

I always use King Arthur flour, and have used all of the techniques at one time or another.  Perhaps a bread flour next time would help.  I have also emailed King Arthur for their comments as well.  Thanks for the feedback. 

Ford's picture
Ford

I use King Arthur bread flour.  I'll send you my recipe.

Ford

Ford's picture
Ford

I use King Arthur brea flour.  I'll send you my recipe to you.

Ford

clazar123's picture
clazar123

When the crumb becomes crumbly in the middle of the loaf esp on day 2 or 3, it is a matter of moisture. There are several things to consider.

1.You can try adding a bit of oil to the recipe to see if that will add to moisture retention. This can be in the form of oil,butter, lard,cream,etc.

2. A vegetable can also add to moisture retention. This can be some potato,squash,banana,etc.

3.It may also help to simply increase the liquid slightly but then build in an autolyze or retard to allow the flour to absorb the liquids more fully.

As always, knead to windowpane for the best crumb.