The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Wholewheat bread containing intact wholewheat berries; like a Duens Dumpy for any South Africans from Cape Town

Nominingi's picture
Nominingi

Wholewheat bread containing intact wholewheat berries; like a Duens Dumpy for any South Africans from Cape Town

I can't for the life of me replicate the whole wheat loaves I grew up on in South Africa. The crumb was filled with wholewheat kernels that gave the bread a pleasant texture. I've tried soaking wheat berries and incorporating them in my dough, I've tried the berries just as they are but no luck so far. The berries seem to melt away!

 

Any suggestions?

 

Many thanks

pmccool's picture
pmccool

I've used whole and cracked grains, sometimes soaked and sometimes scalded, and they were always perceptible in the finished bread.  I generally steer away from using the grains in a dry state for fear they'll be tooth-cracking birdshot after baking, plus drying the bread. 

Is it possible that the grains in the bread of your youth had been toasted or parched before going into the bread dough?

Paul

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Never had that problem either but my pre-cooked or steamed berries are (now that I think about it) cooled down first or made the day before and chilled.  I suppose direct from my rice cooker and a little over mixing might blend them to mush.  I would suggest letting the starches in the grains cool and gel first before adding to the dough.  Or add after developing the dough, like one would add nuts and raisins.

Nominingi's picture
Nominingi

For how long do you cook or steam your berries, Mini?

Thanks

Nominingi's picture
Nominingi

Thanks Mini!

liamkelly's picture
liamkelly

... it may or may not be what you're looking for, but it's a hell of a coincidence that I tucked this one away for safekeeping right before I read your post. The formula calls for bulgur wheat specifically, which makes sense to me because bulgur is usually mostly cracked durum wheat. Durum has the second greatest protein content of any wheat - it might hold up better during your bake and give you the toothsome wheat kernels you're looking for. If it doesn't, go for hard red spring wheat, which has a little more protein

Nominingi's picture
Nominingi

Thanks for posting the formula! It was fun just to read about it. My quest for toothsome wheat kernels continues. The most success I've had has been with bulghur. Am going to try Mini's method next