The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

NOT Hamelman's 80% Sourdough Rye with Soaker

pmccool's picture
pmccool

NOT Hamelman's 80% Sourdough Rye with Soaker

Although it was supposed to have been...

We've had some remodeling done in our basement recently and Valentine's day weekend was when we plunged headlong into the painting of the remodeled space.  (I know how to show a girl a good time, yes I do!)  The ceiling, which had had the popcorn texture scraped down, required a coat of primer and a coat of ceiling paint.  Because it is a basement space, there are a lot of boxed out areas in the ceiling for heat ducts, plumbing runs, etc.  So, lots and lots of cutting in to do before the actual production painting could begin.  The walls got a new color which, fortunately, only required a single coat to cover.  All of the trim got a new coat of enamel.  Oh, yeah, there was much spackling and caulking to do before any paint cans were opened.

So, in and around all of this activity, I decided to make some rye bread.  What could be easier than a sourdough that is essentially set it and forget it, right?  That leaves plenty of uninterrupted time for painting, with just a few breaks to tend to the bread.

Friday evening, I put together the sponge and the soaker.  As I was putting the flour away before heading back to the painting, I noticed the label on the canister said "Whole Wheat".  Uh-oh.  It hadn't even registered that I didn't have the rye flour while making the sponge and soaker.  That's no small oversight, since the color, texture, and aroma are all different than the whole wheat flour.  Maybe it was the paint fumes.  Maybe I was tired.  Maybe I was just too distracted to have paid the requisite attention.  No matter, the flour was the wrong type and, after much muttering, I decided to forge ahead by making the bread with the rye and whole wheat flours reversed.

Saturday morning came and I made up the final dough.  It rose more or less as predicted in my proofer (house temperature was about 68F, which would have slowed it considerably) for both the bulk and final fermentations.  Into the oven for the allotted time at the recommended temperature and then out when the internal temperature reached 205F.  And this is what I had:

The scoring's nothing to write home about but the color and aroma were very attractive.

Another view:

And a closer view of the crumb:

Oddly enough, the first thing I thought when I had a taste was "Rye!"  Even though the rye flour is a small component, it has an outsize effect on the flavor.  The soaker/scald also produced a heavier texture and moisture content that is very much in keeping with high-rye breads, even to the point of being just slightly gummy when sliced.  It might have benefitted from a slightly longer bake but it has been thoroughly enjoyable to eat as is.

If all blunders came out this well, no one would ever be afraid of making a mistake.  

Paul

Comments

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

Hope you and the paint fumes are finished with each other. Your mistake looks wonderful !  I also really enjoyed the bucolic setting in South Africa. If I remember correctly you go there every year ? Wonderful pics and the bakery looks very tempting. We travel in Holland but you don't get any good bread there at all unless it is brought in by the German bakers. 

I wish I could convince my husband that we should cycle in South Africa ...we have had friends do it ...but he is adamant that it is not a place we need to ride. Maybe by car !!  c

pmccool's picture
pmccool

the carpet is laid, the furniture is back in (mostly), and the decorative elements are going up, so it is looking less like a construction site and more like what we had in mind.

Thank you; it is one of my better mistakes.  ;-)

We've been back to South Africa twice in the 4-1/2 years since we returned to the States.  Both times were for weddings and that particular family is now out of daughters, so it will have to be a different excuse for going in the future. 

South Africa has so much beauty and a lot of South Africans are nuts about bicycling.  I think you and your husband would love it.  Just google "south africa bike tours" or "south africa bike races" and you'll get lots of options.  I can put you in touch with some local enthusiasts, if you like.  For first time visitors like yourselves (if you do go), it might be better to work with someone who can package a group tour.  That will give you more freedom to focus on the ride itself without worrying about where to go, what to eat, where to sleep, etc.

Paul

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

We are going on a long tour in June-Oct in the US. Starting in the PNW and working our way to a relatives home in New Orleans.  We then want to do something next winter. We have talked about New Zealand but when I saw the pic of that valley in South Africa I was really sold on that. I will keep in touch and let you know as we closer to next Winter. Thanks again. c

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

should make some fine toast too.  The great thing about AZ is there is no basement to remodel because the ground is too hard to dig one in the first place.  Another good thing is there is no place to put the junk one picks up over the years so you buy less stuff in the first place :-)  Nice recovery and 

Happy baking Paul

pmccool's picture
pmccool

Some pastrami, some Swiss cheese, a bit of mustard and yum!

Aside from the excavation costs, I think a basement in AZ would be a wonderful thing; so much cooler than upstairs!  You are right about it being a repository for things that accumulate, though.

Paul

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Lovely places in SA.

Sorry wrong thread Paul.  This bleongs on the other one.

isand66's picture
isand66

Nice happy mistake Paul.  Now that you are done with your basement, feel free to come to NY and take a stab at my 1960's basement :)

Anyway, your bread look great and I'm sure tasted just as good.  It's always rewarding to recover from a blunder and end up with something so good.

Regards,
Ian