The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Please help me find a recipe for this

bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe

Please help me find a recipe for this

Hi Guys,

I am looking for a recipe which has the following:

- zero sugar added

- high fiber

- carbs blocking bread

- white flour to be used preferably

- low salt

- all natural and perishable

This is for my mother, she loves bread.  I look forward to hearing form you guys.

Thanks

 

 

 

Jon OBrien's picture
Jon OBrien

What does that mean?

White flour is low in fibre. You can have fibre or white flour but not both, sadly.

bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe

 

Hi Jon,

What I mean by "carbs blocking bread" is I want to add normal amount of carbs ( I want white bread, thus would add white flour), but I want to put something in there to block the carbs from disassociate in the human body, like a starch blocker or a "magical powder" that will prevent humans from digesting the carbs.  Is this possible and is there something out there like this?

 

Also can I not add additional high fibre e.g. Isomaltooligosaccharide to help increase the fibre content within the bread?

I look forward to hearing from you.

Jon OBrien's picture
Jon OBrien

Too much buggering about with the human body, not to mention adulteration of a good thing, for me.

Sorry, I can't help.

KathyF's picture
KathyF

This recipe for a low carb bread was posted a while ago. I haven't tried it, but it looks good in the pictures. http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/43131/low-carb-multigrain-bread

I don't know of any ingredient for blocking carbs.

bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe

Hi KathyF,

Thank you for the link but my mum likes white bread :) so I hope someone on here has given it a go and succeed.

Thanks  

KathyF's picture
KathyF

Well, you could leave out the added grains and seeds. In the comments the OP recommends a different whey protein isolate that will give a more "Wonderbread" texture to the loaf.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

This is a whole wheat flour that is derived from wheat that does not have the tan or red color. It is very bland tasting but behaves like a whole grain. The loaf will be a creamy white color but will tend to mkae a dense loaf unless you are experienced in working with whole grains. Nothing "blocks" carbs but wwhole grain helps reduce the impact somewhat.

When you say your Mum likes white bread-you need to explain what this means. Are you trying to make a fluffy,verywhite appearing, spongey loaf like store bought bread? Shreddably soft bread is possible but it will not be low carb and may have added fat. 

Good luck.

bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe

My mum likes white loaf bread from the stores, she is disbetic thus i was thinking if i can get rid of the starch that will help with her blood sugars, also she dsnt like bland bread but something that taste good, i was thinking the high fibre will help with her blood sugar, i read white kidney beans extract help to avoid the starch, am i right

bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe

My mum likes white loaf bread from the stores, she is disbetic thus i was thinking if i can get rid of the starch that will help with her blood sugars, also she dsnt like bland bread but something that taste good, i was thinking the high fibre will help with her blood sugar, i read white kidney beans extract help to avoid the starch, am i right

Thanshin's picture
Thanshin

- zero sugar added: Most breads have no sugar. Bread is mostly carbs, though.

- high fiber: It's easy to add any amount of fiber to bread. It won't be white, though.

- carbs blocking bread: There is no such thing. Whoever tried to tell you the contrary, is trying to get into your wallet.

- white flour to be used preferably: Ok, but it won't have high fiber, though.

- low salt: You can make bread with no salt, it will taste worse, though.

- all natural and perishable: I'd dare to say everyone here makes bread all natural.

 

So, in essence, what I suggest is a sourdough white with added oatbran but without putting in the salt.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/31612/oat-bran-sourdough-flavor

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/37114/100-sourdough-oat-bran-bread

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/36714/todays-steel-cut-oats-sourdough

bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe

Would white rye flour not work, and what is the taste of this kind of bread, is it like all the healthy kinds, my mum does not like sourdough, can i not add fibre to white flour by crushing it eg oats thus it wont change color?

Thanshin's picture
Thanshin

You can replace rye flour in those recipes with white.

I suggested sourdough because you asked for natural. I don't see baker's yeast as natural.

no problem with adding oats. Take into account oats dry the dough though, so you'll need to add water (in a proportion that I don't know)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

and a good shade of tan, but 5% of the flour will give more taste to the bread but not darken it.  

You could make a darker than white bread and make Mum wear sunglasses.  ???  :)

The only "bread" I know of without starch (carbohydrates) is one made with egg whites.  Easy to try and see what you think of it.    Makes six portions and best eaten the same day.

 Oopsie bread    

http://www.food.com/recipe/oopsie-bread-497736

AbeNW11's picture
AbeNW11 (not verified)

You don't need sugar in bread so that's sorted.

I think white wheat (which has been mentioned) is the best way to go for "white" flour. It is still whole wheat so will have fibre but all the benefits of what people associate with white flour.

Carb blocking? Well you can make it better carbs with wholegrain and further that if you make it a sourdough. Perhaps swap 20% of the gluten grain flour with some other non gluten flour which is low in carbs.

Salt? Well the amount of salt in bread is so little I don't think you need be concerned. Normally 2% of total flour should be salt but you can drop that a tad if you wish.

And if you make it at home it will be natural.

 

 

bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe

Thank you all for the advice, i am new to baking so i am sorry but i have some questions, would i need starter and what is this made from for what i am trying to achieve?, what about yeast, i know sourdough has natural yeast but how do i take that and put it into my white bread?

I was going to make sourdough bread for my mum (age 89) but she wanted something that she could not buy from the stores, also she loves white bread ☺ so i am doing this to bring a smile on her face.

Thanks again

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I have good b=news and bad news.  I too am diabetic and did not want to give up bread.  The problem is that the breads you find in the store aren't the best - even though here in the states there are some that are better and made as low carb.  Generally speaking diabetics need high fiber, whole grain breads made with sourdough starter using flour with a low glycemic index.

Barley flour is the best by far with rye next.  The key is limiting the amount of bread you eat.  1 slice of bread is 1 tsp of sugar to a diabetic.  Whole grains and sourdough spread out the impact of the sugar on the body and reduce blood sugar spikes and why they are the best by far for diabetics to eat and sprouted grains are even better.   Now for the bad news -  white flour yeast breads are the absolute very worst bread choice for a diabetic to eat in any amount for than a quarter slice per meal.   A nice thin 3/16 slice of sprouted half whole grain rye and sprouted half whole grain barley sourdough pumpernickel bread is a much better choice for any meal. - but no more.  My blog has al kinds of sprouted whole grain sourdough breads for this reason and no yeast white breads for this reason.  Here is a web site that might get you thinking differently.  Sorry fo the bad news

http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/blog/chasing-the-perfect-bread-for-a-diabetic-diet/

bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe

I appreciate the comments and the advice, really do but my mother only has white bread from time to time it is not a continuous thing, she follows a strict diet but i am trying to make her a bread that will not affect her sugar levels and she will love, this is why i was asking if there is something i can put into the mix to get rid of the starch but i have been told that is not possible,

AbeNW11's picture
AbeNW11 (not verified)

Fibre in the wholegrain will control the sugar levels better. It is these simple sugars you find in white flour which causes ones sugar level to rise because it has the fibre taken out. So while carbs should be eaten in moderation also make sure they are wholegrain. 

So too with pasta. Go wholegrain. And I'll tell you something interesting with pasta. A study was done about the effects of pasta on sugar levels and here was the result...

1. Eating pasta elevated ones sugar levels steeply (I think this study was done with white pasta)

2. But when cooled (i.e. leftovers) it didn't elevate the sugar levels so steeply. 

3. When reheated it improved even further and kept ones sugar levels more balanced. 

So leftover pasta that is reheated is much better then fresh pasta with its effect on ones sugar levels. 

Stick to wholegrain, even pasta, and wholegrain sourdough even better plus eat the correct amounts. There is no magic zero carb bread but it can be included as part of a healthy diet. Everything in the correct amounts. 

 

bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe

Thanks for the advice but as i said my mum has a strict diet, here and there she has a treat which i thinks she deserves.

Anyone with advice on how i can achive my goal that would be appreciated e.g how i set the starter (ingredients),how long do i let it ferment, do i need to add ascorbic acid, is there a way to get the natural yeast from sourdough bread and add it to my mix, i know white whole wheat is what i will use but i can add other small amounts to increase thr fibre concent; any suggestions and how much, can i add sourdough flour along with other flours or would it make the final bread sour, i look forward to hearing from you guys

Thanshin's picture
Thanshin

You can create a starter (sourdough) from scratch at home with just flour, water and a little time.

There are lots of tutorials online and videos in youtube detailing different techniques but, in essence (and how I did it) you put a small amount of water and flour in a closed but non sealed glass jar and then every 12h you remove some of it and add some more water and flour in equal weights.

It takes a few days of doing that and you'll have your own starter.

From then on, you just keep a jar of starter, feed it from time to time and add it to dough so it rises.

With 1kg of white flour, 1l of water and 1 week of time. you could make an excellent bread without ever using any other ingredient. You could add salt for a better taste.

bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe

 

Thank you thalin, is there a way to color brown bread dough to white as i know in industries thy use caramel to gt white folour to brown dough

pmccool's picture
pmccool

Is there a bakery in your area that makes sourdough breads from scratch?  If yes, have a chat with them to see whether they make any breads with white whole wheat.  If the answer to that question is yes, buy it.  That's the simplest route of all.

If there is a bakery in your area that makes sourdough bread from scratch but they don't use white whole wheat, ask for a bit of their starter.  The worst they can do is say no.  If they do provide you with a bit, then you've saved yourself a week or two of building a starter of your own.

Or, if there is no such bakery in your area, are there any family / friends / acquaintances / friends of friends who bake sourdough bread?  If yes, see if they will share some starter with you.  Again, you can skip the build a starter stage and go straight to baking with it.

You can even obtain sourdough starter from sources like King Arthur Flour or Friends of Carl by mail order.  For that matter, some TFLer might be able to gift you with some.

Once you have a starter, your own or others', think of that as your yeast because it is.  There is nothing to extract from it.  You simply add a quantity of it as one of the ingredients in the bread dough.  Let's leave the conversation about maintaining a starter for another post, just to keep things from getting too complicated in this post.

The white whole wheat flour will produce a bread that whose color is somewhere between creamy and pale tan.  It won't be snowy white, nor is there an effective way for the home baker to bleach it lighter.  It will give you the higher fiber content that you desire.  And your mom will probably notice that her blood sugar spikes less after a meal that includes sourdough bread than it does after the identical meal that includes regular yeasted bread. (See dabrownman's post above for someone's first-hand experience.)  Scientists are still learning why sourdough bread produces a different outcome than other breads but it seems to be related at least in part to the lactic acids produced by the lactobacillus bacteria that also inhabit the sourdough starter.  Ascorbic acid is not required in bread although you are certainly free to add it if you wish.

In addition to the recipe links given above, here's one from Sourdough Home. The only adjustments you will need to make are to substitute white whole wheat flour for the regular whole wheat flour, eliminate the honey, eliminate the optional gluten, and reduce the salt to your mom's liking.  You might have to increase the water by a teaspoon or so because of eliminating the honey.  The rest should be a matter of following Mike's instructions.

Paul

bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe

Thank you paul one last thing, because i will be using sourdough starter will this make the bread sour?

pmccool's picture
pmccool

Yes, there will probably be some sourness.  This can be minimized by using the starter/levain at an early stage of fermentation and by using a larger quantity of starter, with maybe 30-40% of the total flour in the starter/levain.  

Please remember that you will be making a different bread than what your mom favors.  It will taste different and it will have a different texture.  That is unavoidable because it needs to affect her differently than the bread she presently likes.  

The bread that you make will be delicious.  Your mom has had to make other adjustments; this will be one of the easier ones. 

Regards,

Paul

bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe
bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe
bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe
bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe
bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe
bakery_wanabe's picture
bakery_wanabe

hi paul, yeah i spoke to my mom about it and she was not happy i would be making sourdough bread lol, but yes i will give it a go, now if i start with white wheat flour and add e.g 100% stone ground whole wheat flour this should bring down the carbs, am i right? also i can add additional fiber to increase the fiber content right?

thanks again

pmccool's picture
pmccool

Well, not really.  The whole grain flour will include a higher percentage of complex carbohydrates, rather than being mostly simple carbohydrates as in the white flour, but they will still be carbohydrates.  And they will still cause your mum's blood sugar levels to rise.  The whole grain flours do include a higher fiber content, since the bran has not been removed, that do white flours.  If you want to add more, you certainly may.

If you do pursue the sourdough route, rather than using commercial yeast, she may well see a smaller increase in her blood sugar levels than she presently does from eating her favored bread.

I'm pressed for time just now but will try to get back to you with some additional information.

Paul

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Wanabe, mentioned it earlier but not sure you saw or read the link.

pmccool's picture
pmccool

It looks like you had tried to ask what I meant by using a starter when it is still in the early stages of fermentation.  That recommendation is based on the typical growth of the yeasts and lactobacilli in a starter.  A 'young' starter is one that has not expanded fully, whereas a 'ripe' starter is one that has reached full expansion and is beginning to collapse.  Here is a picture collage that illustrates the principle.  Each photo pair was taken at approximately one-hour intervals.  The left-hand pair of columns show the first 4 hours of growth and the right-hand columns show the 5th through 8th hours of growth.

You can see that bubbles are beginning to develop 4 hours after feeding.  After 5 hours, bubbles are distributed throughout the starter and the volume has increased to about 1.5x the original volume.  At 6 hours, volume has approximately doubled from the starting point and there is a noticeable dome on the starter.  Around 7 hours, the starter has reached its maximum expansion, not quite tripling the original volume, and the dome is even more prominent.  Somewhere between the 7th and 8th hours after feeding, the starter began to collapse.  At 8 hours, the dome has collapsed and the bubbles are growing larger as their walls begin to break down so that smaller ones coalesce into larger ones.  The temperature in my kitchen was about 70F the day these pictures were taken.  Things would have progressed more quickly with warmer temperatures and more slowly with cooler temperatures.

In case you are wondering about the color, this starter was fed a blend of bread flour, whole rye flour, and whole wheat flour.

If I had used the starter around the 5-hour mark, it would have produced a bread with milder sour notes than the bread that I made when the starter was 8 hours past feeding.  That's because the yeasts were already quite active at that stage but the lactobacilli had not had time to produce much acid.  Similarly, a bread made with a larger quantity of starter will typically be milder in flavor than a bread made with a smaller quantity of starter.  The larger quantity will drive a faster (shorter) fermentation, which allows less opportunity for the lactobacilli to develop the acids that produce the sour flavors.

One last idea for you to consider, since it can help tenderize the crumb without adding more fats, is the tang zhong or water roux method.  You can type either term into the Search box in the upper right-hand corner of the page to pull up a list of posts that discuss the technique.

Paul

Cjotter's picture
Cjotter

my starter, even when it was making good bread (which it isn't at the moment) did that.  Is that all at room temperature? What are you feeding?

pmccool's picture
pmccool

Yes, that sequence shows growth at room temperature; about 70F that day.  The feed was mostly bread flour, with maybe 10% each of whole rye and whole wheat flours. 

Paul

dobie's picture
dobie

Hey Paul

Good report and great looking starter. What is the hydration?

dobie

pmccool's picture
pmccool

I just chucked in the water, then added flour until it felt right.  Maybe 60%, give or take.

Paul

Jon OBrien's picture
Jon OBrien

Isn't talking about paleolithic bread like talking about Victorian nuclear technology?