The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sprouting Black Rice

dobie's picture
dobie

Sprouting Black Rice

I have a friend from Japan (20 years in the US and a very talented nurse) who asked me some questions that I do not know the answer to, that I thought you guys might know.

Japanese Wild Black Rice is different from US Wild Black Rice?

My understanding is that US Wild Black Rice, is not actually rice, per se, but I couldn't tell you what it is (but maybe somebody here does know).

By that, I mean the grain that the Native Americans (my people) thrash into their canoes from the lake and creek shorelines, particularly in the up north of the US, Wisconsin or thereabouts.

I think the Wild Black Rice that my Japanese friend is referring to (which I'm not familiar with), is probably a true rice and not the Wild Black Rice here in the US. Does anyone know?

Can either be expected to be sprouted?

Further; in the processing of raw rice (of any kind), the husk is thrashed and results in 'brown rice', I think. White rice is 'polished', much as 'pearled' barley would be?

As such, white rice (or anything polished or pearled) probably wouldn't be able to be sprouted, whereas brown rice (or Wild Black Rice of either sort), probably could be (I'm only guessing)?

I have promised some form of sprouted rice bread (which I find intrigueing) and am just at a loss as to what I should do. Of course, I don't want to re-invent the wheel, so I'm asking your advice.

Thanks in advance

dobie

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven
dobie's picture
dobie

Thank you MO

I was actually just reading the same Wiki link.

Thank you very much for the 'sproutpeople' link. Very nice indeed.

dobie

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

When I read down at the bottom of the wiki info that wild rice can also have ergot, I wondered how long that has been happening and if it is the same strain as the European Ergot.  Seed Archaeology might be interesting in that respect.  Might even be a shaman source of medicine.  Hard to miss it when there.

dobie's picture
dobie

MO

Ergot being the hallucinagenic mold, attributed to Rye that drove the Middle Ages crazy? You know, believing witches cursed their otherwise perfect lives? As I recall some say it was even responsible for the French revolution.

I'm sure that is not a particularly exact statement, just off the top of my head, but something like that, n'est pas?

dobie

Jon OBrien's picture
Jon OBrien

"Ergot being the hallucinagenic mold, attributed to Rye that drove the Middle Ages crazy? You know, believing witches cursed their otherwise perfect lives?"

Also believed to be behind the werewolf myths.

dobie's picture
dobie

Very interesting Jon. I didn't know that, but it makes sense.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

on wild rice   http://www.mnwildrice.com/riceinfo.htm

mention is made that preserve the seeds, it was parched in the fire and this heating continues.  So one might have to be particular for a good choice of seed to sprout.

dobie's picture
dobie

That is an incredible link.

It is actually very informative, but I have a few issues, so I will lay down some quotes here to make it easier for others to see if they wish.

'Wild Rice, Minnesota's State Grain..., this highly nutritious grain is not actually rice, but an annual water-grass seed, "zizania aquatica". Naturally abundant in the cold rivers and lakes of Minnesota and Canada, wild rice was the staple in the diet of the Chippewa and Sioux Indians, native to this region.'

OK, I'm not Chippewa nor Sioux, but as one eighth Chactow, I am family. We've met.

I'm sure someone with a better understanding of Biology can explain to me, what is rice if not a 'water grass'?

'Even today, the wild rice grown on Minnesota state waters is regulated and must be harvested in the traditional indian way.'

Even today...regulated? I'm pretty sure my great grandmother would tell you if she could, that the only regulation 'in the traditional indian way' would be that if you poach my plot, I'll beat your head.

Second, 'indian' should at least be capitalized out of respect.

I know this article was probably written in the 1960-1970's so I will forgive the faux pas regarding the current politically correct terminology of 'Native Americans'.

My great grandmother told me that the name of a 'tribe' (Chactow, Sioux, etc.) meant first 'People' or 'Human Beings', perhaps of a particular region or tendency, but as 'Indians or Americans', was not our concern.

How one comes to this next conclusion is beyond me and obviously just pure lunacy.

'Even today, the wild rice grown on Minnesota state waters is regulated and must be harvested in the traditional indian way. That means one must first purchase a license, then harvest wild rice during state regulated seasons.'

No indigenous human being, from whatever tribe, ever required a license to harvest anything during 'State Regulated Seasons'.

So that is clearly not 'the traditional indian way'. Quite the contrary.

'The rice must be harvested from a canoe, utilizing only a pole for power and two rice beater sticks as flails to knock the mature seeds into the bottom of the boat.'

So if you only have one 'rice beater stick' it would be illegal? It's just such idiotic writing.

But if you can sift thru the BS, this is actually a very informative link and I thank you MO.

Thank you for letting me rant; there was just so much wrong, so offensive and basically this is why I try to avoid putting pen to paper; some one might read it 50 years later and I will be the jerk.

Of course, we don't always have to wait that long, and for that (or is it this), I apologize.

dobie

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I prefer the "First Nation" title used in Canada, makes more sense.   I have to admit I was looking more at the handling of rice than the politics and bias of the author.  Sorry it was such a nasty distraction.  Like I said, glad you set the article straight and in such a humorous way.  Certainly was the short list of native tribes for such a large area of wetlands.  

I was up at the origin of the Mississippi this summer and amazing how the "explorers" argue about the source and who found out what when.  Oblivious to the fact that they got their directions from the native guides who lived on the land and knew the source all along from observation.  

Here is a similar article but cleaned up.  http://www.healthybenefitsof.com/p/wild-rice.html

dobie's picture
dobie

Yes MO, I like that. I forgot all about that term.

Again, the link was actually very informative and certainly not a nasty distraction. I was just up too late and getting a little cranky. I'm all better now.

And I apologize to you and Jane Dough for calling wild rice 'wild black rice'. It's what I've heard it referred to around here (I guess cause it's black), but I will only refer to it as wild rice from here on out. My bad.

Thanks again guys, it's all good.

embth's picture
embth

Greetings Mini….The hand-parched wild rice sold in MN is the best.  Cooks up quickly and tastes great.  Just you do much touring in MN?  Wish I had known you were coming….I'd have baked wild rice bread.   Embth

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

(say that 10x!)  Will it sprout is the question...  I often catch a smoky something on wild rice and love the stuff.  Just went thru my pantry...(forgot to take a good whiff of the rye flour for the other posted Q) and didn't see any wild or red rice.  Did find my buckwheat flour and some kamut berries hiding in there.  

The MN trip went much too fast and spent the first afternoon and early evening with the good people of  St. Joseph's in Park Rapids.  Father slipped on some mossy wet wood (not at the park) and cracked a few bones.  Has since recovered nicely but we pushed him around in the park with a transport chair (the one with the small wheels) to test major park paths and accessibility.   Dad got to watch people dunking their heads in the headway of the North Amer. "Father of all Rivers"  witnessing the traditional great American baptism going on.  What a riot!  :)

Jane Dough's picture
Jane Dough

Way up north here in Manitoba we would never. - and I mean never - refer to our Wild Rice as black rice.  That would be like calling an apple an orange. 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Don't panic, Jane.  I've never heard anyone refer to North American wild rice as black rice.   In South east Asia, I've never heard black rice called wild.   Expensive perhaps but never wild.  Looks shorter too.

Jane Dough's picture
Jane Dough

Bump on the highway.  

Jane Dough's picture
Jane Dough

Too late.  I'm panicked :). We Northern folks are not as thick-skinned as we try to portray 

You must have been down around Itasca.  Itasca is one of the most beautiful state parks I have ever camped at.  It is also home to the best wild rice soup. 

Up here you will see wild rice bread fairly often.   It is one of my favourite additions to a loaf. 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I guess I missed the soup.  We were staying not far away and the park was a day trip.  

I had never thought about sprouting wild rice so I find it all so interesting.  Might have to try it and see how I like it in bread or with shushimi.  Or even mixed with sushi rice.  Pickled ginger and roasted laver.  Yup, I can almost taste it as a wild rice-sushi blend, would like to try the sprouts.  

Note to self:   Add to the bucket list... wild rice and sesame seed sprouts.  :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Emperor's rice, Forbidden rice, Japanese Black Rice, Thai Jasmine Black rice and Wild rice.  Wild rice is much bigger than the rest of them.  Emperor's and Forbidden  seem to be the same to me.the Thais smells like jasmine so is different..  i like the wild rice the best but it is 3 times more expensive that the others'

Al of them sprout easily and well and are great in bread.  I like PR;s Wild Rice and Onion, Maria Speck;s Aromaand hanseata's (karins) take on wild rice bread.   I Have made a lot of black and wild rice bread both sprouted and un-sprouted and it remains one of my very favorites.  .

Just type black or wild rice into the search box and you will. get plenty of hits

Happy baking with wild and othe black rice

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

rice are also grasses and derived from wild ones.