The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Adjusting for King Arthur White Whole-wheat flour

Janet Yang's picture
Janet Yang

Adjusting for King Arthur White Whole-wheat flour

The KA website says that White Whole-wheat flour can be substituted for up to a third of regular flour. I tried substituting about 28%, and found that the dough mixed up rather stiff. Twice I had to add more water (which isn't as easy once the gluten is active).

Can anybody provide some guidelines on how recipes should be adjusted for White Whole-wheat? Should I be using less flour or more water, and what percentage change?

Janet

STUinlouisa's picture
STUinlouisa

With that level of white whole wheat I would start by adding about 5% based on total water. An example would be 315g instead of 300g. Another and I think a better way is to autolyse and while mixing in the leavening and salt adjust with either water or flour to the consistency that you want the dough. That way you won't have to fight the gluten.

I really like white whole wheat and use it in most of my loaves. Hope you get it worked out.

Janet Yang's picture
Janet Yang

Does the amount of yeast stay the same? 

I noticed that the preferment (from sourdough starter) grew a lot faster on white whole wheat than on all-purpose. 

STUinlouisa's picture
STUinlouisa

Whole wheat makes the beasties happy and they do move faster. I usually just let the dough dictate when it is ready both in primary fermentation and in proofing. If you want there is always the option of retarding the dough by putting it in a cool spot.

Maverick's picture
Maverick

White whole wheat is used the same as the regular (red) whole wheat. So the guidelines are the same other than flavor.

Postal Grunt's picture
Postal Grunt

Something that works for me has been to soak the WWW flour with the main dough water before mixing with the levain and the rest of the flour. All it takes is just about twenty minutes of soaking. I've also done a soaker of the WWW flour with an equivalent percentage of the water. That is, if the WWW is to be 28% of your flour, take roughly 28% of your main dough water and soak it for a while. I've done a four hour soak and not experienced anything detrimental. Keep in mind that I mix my dough to around 70% hydration so most of my dough isn't dry and/or tight at all.

If you're using using a poolish or other preferment, you can always use the WWW in the preferment. I've been doing that and so far, the bread police haven't broken down my door. Have fun in the kitchen!

rgconner's picture
rgconner

It is a good plan to do that. The yeast love bran, and will break it down some for you so it does not impact gluten development as much.

Maverick's picture
Maverick

Reinhart does an overnight soaker with the whole wheat flour, water, and salt in his whole grains book.