The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Guinness Polenta Porridge Bread

isand66's picture
isand66

Guinness Polenta Porridge Bread

I'm a little late for a St. Paddy's day bread, but I do have to say this one is worth the wait.  The combination of Guinness, polenta with mixed whole grain flakes as a porridge and potatoes created a wonderfully moist and flavorful loaf.  I threw in some freshly sprouted and ground whole wheat flour just for good measure.  If you have not tried a porridge bread yet, than all I can say is you don't know what you are missing!

If you are worried that the Guinness will overpower the bread, don't worry your little heads off :).  The beer really only adds a subtle undertone flavor and if you didn't know it was in the dough you would have a hard time guessing it was present.

Now if Spring would only decide to show up and wipe away the snow we had yesterday I would be much happier.  At least I have a nice hearty bread to go along with the 27 degree weather :).

Closeup1

Guinness Porridge Bread (%)

Guinness Porridge Bread (weights)

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

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Levain Directions Build 1

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

Levain Directions Build 2

Add in the sprouted whole wheat flour and the water and mix for a minute.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.  I put it in the refrigerator and used it the next evening but you can use it to mix the main dough right away if you want.

Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4's of the water called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the water is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the water and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours  and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge, potatoes and salt and mix on low for 4 minutes and speed #2 for another 2 minutes or by hand for about 6 minutes.   You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it's size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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crumb

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

really came through.  Sprouted flour with a polenta porridge is pretty wild and a bit Lucy like if you ask me - She see's your 7 apprentices at work in this recipe.  Some fancy do slashing really brought out the beauty of the crust and that crumb is spot on.  Still, the taste has to be the best part of this bread.

Lucy has 1 left over Guinness from St Paddy's and I got her a box of pre-made polenta from the close out basket at Sprouts.  Now she has everything for her version of this bread but it probably won't be as pretty as this one.

Happy baking Ian and Lucy sends her best to Max, Lexi and the 5 frry ones

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks DA.  Glad you and Lucy like it and I look forward to seeing her rendition of it soon.  Send some of that warm weather our way....it's around 32 degrees with a high of 40 if we are lucky today.

Happy Baking to you and Lucy as well.

Ian

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

Ian:  That looks just gorgeous.  Wonderful crumb on such a dark bread, so you must be so pleased.  I think my husband would like this bread.  If you were to substitute for the mashed potatoes, what would you use?  I  don't have any flaked grains, either!  The crust and scoring are perfect as well.  I have to say it's a bit warmer out here in California.  We have had record heat here, which is helping my starter grow at a faster pace.  Thanks for sharing your Guinness bread and congratulations.  Best,  Phyllis

p.s.  I am just not a beer drinker, but I did have Guinness in a pub in Ireland on a Sunday in Dublin more than 30 years ago.  The bartender said that the pub was closing, but he brought my husband (to be at the time) and me cheese sandwiches and Guinness, as we were starving.  It was really fun!

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Phyllis.  I'm not a big beer drinker either but once in a while it's nice to have one in the summer after a long hot day.  My wife actually had bought a 6 pack of Guinness for her corned beef she made last week so I figured I might as well try to use another can :).

You can substitute rolled oats for the mixed flakes with out a problem.  Just leave the potatoes out if you don't want to add them and maybe up the water a bit to make up for the lack of water content in the water.

Let me know if you give this one a try and if you have any other questions.

Regards,
Ian

nmygarden's picture
nmygarden

Love the color and the crust - check out those happy polenta bits peeking out. Love corn in bread! No doubt, this one tastes great with the combination of grains, and soft for sandwiches with the porridge and potato. Did you use milk or water to make the porridge?

As for the snow - you may need to chase it away. Crank up the grill and cook up some pizza - that oughta do it!

Best to you and your crew!

Cathy

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Cathy.

sorry about the confusion.  It was water in this case.

Cooked some steaks on the grill.

Regards,

Ian

bridgebum's picture
bridgebum

That bread is a beauty! However, in reading through things I'm a bit confused. The description talks about adding milk for the porridge, but the ingredient list shows water. And I would assume the polenta is cooked along with the 6 grain flakes and water (milk?), but the directions mention adding "levain, cooled porridge, polenta and salt", suggesting that the polenta was not part of the porridge. If you could clarify things, I'd greatly appreciate it!

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks.  Sorry about the confusion.  I used a previous post to create this one.  It should be water and not milk.  Also the polenta was cooked as part of the porridge.

Regards

Ian

isand66's picture
isand66

Post is updated to reflect water in porridge and not milk as well as correct directions for building 2 stage levain and adding potatoes to main dough.  Again, sorry about the mistakes.

 
hanseata's picture
hanseata

Everything that's in there is good for you!

Did you use Guinness Stout or Draft? According to Cook's Illustrated Draft holds up better in longer cooking/baking procedures.

Karin

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Karin.  I think I used draft.  Will have to double check.  Glad you like the bread.

Regards,

Ian

a_warming_trend's picture
a_warming_trend

I have a back-log of your formulas that have inspired me, but your use of polenta/grits is particularly intriguing. Super work, as always!

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks.  Appreciate your kind words and hope you get to try this one.

Regards

Ian