The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

What should we have for dinner?

Ruth Redburn's picture
Ruth Redburn

What should we have for dinner?

I am in the middle of a book called "The Omnivores Dilemma" by Michael Pollan.  I recommend this book for many of you because I know you care for the preservation of the earth, our air and water.  I haven't seen anyone else mention this book so had to bring it up myself.  It is not particularly about bread but about the food we eat and how it is produced.  Maybe like me, you will then find out that eating animals raised on huge factory farms, is not for you. 

Ruth Redburn

breadnerd's picture
breadnerd

I added it to my hold list at the library. I just read "Animal Vegetable Miracle" by Barbara Kingsolver this summer, and it talks about eating locally and the troubles with how our food is produced.

Its made me a lot more thoughtful about my food purchases, and was very inspirational in encouraging me to make the most of my own garden--I preserved a LOT more food for myself this year--in fact, I have to go make a batch of grape jelly and my (hopefully) last batch of canned tomatoes!

Once the gardening season is over and I have a little more time on my hands, I'm going to work on sourcing more of my food locally. We have a lot of good family farms providing meat around here, I just have to find a good fit for my budget and time :) We also (to bring this back on topic) have a few folks selling fresh wheat flour, so I think I'll bake through the WGB book this fall using their flours.

 

Anybody try to grow wheat for fun in a home garden? I think it would be cool to do it, but I haven't tried yet.

Ruth Redburn's picture
Ruth Redburn

 Thanks, Breadnerd,  That is exactly what Pollan is advocating.  I hope you enjoy the book.  I shall have to read Kingsolver next.  Another of her books was recommended to me lately, her latest novel, I believe. 

I envy you being able to grow lots of your own fruits and vegies.  I live in an "adult" community now and miss my garden.  I do grow some tomatoes and lettuces,carrots, and herbs in pots and earthboxes on my small patio.  My daughter in England grows what she can, including her own potatoes, onion, leeks, toms and Red Sails lettuce which I send her.  Her husband is a sheep farmer on about 60 acres.  They buy no fertilizer.  Everything is organic.  Now I have her baking bread too, tho' the bakeries there are great.  Now if I ownly could get her to bring me some sour orange can so I can make marmelade. 

Ruth

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 

 If you want to make marmalade, I found the Sevile oranges are in season about February, this is both in UK and Canada, the recipe I used had a pecentage of sweet oranges as well.

Or here in Canada, Southern Ontario we can get large tins of Mar made, it is only oranges ready to be made in to marmalade, will make 6 pound...... My SIL makes it every year..... qahtan

Ruth Redburn's picture
Ruth Redburn

   qahtan, Thanks, but I live in the US.  I can buy the tins at Williams-Sonoma, but they are so expensive there.  I have to find the Sevilles here in the US or ask my daughter to pack a tin in her luggage and that is asking a lot. I no longer can travel there easily, but I used to bring them back when we went to England.               Ruth Redburn