The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Yeast Bread and rain.

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ch774's picture
ch774

Yeast Bread and rain.

Yes, my question is when I bake cinnamon rolls and it is raining outside. Why does  it not come out? I know its the humidity. But It does not look very professional when I give them. Is there any thing I can do different?

I use the oven to let it rise, and it rises and does like it is suppose to do. But when its baking time. "Oops"

Please let me know

Thanks

Cheryl

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

How does their baked difference differ on the rainy days?

Your flour will probably have absorbed more water from the air on rainy days.  Thus it will require less water to make the dough.  Are you using the same amount regardless of weather?

I'm not a pro - these are just a few facts that will help others solve your problem.

ch774's picture
ch774

 

Thank You, It bakes different as to it does not rise the same in the oven after the 3rd rise. I use 1/2-c in the yeast. I notice on good day's the dough is sticky. And I have to use more. When I made it this time it was kinda dry?

 

Does this make sense?

 

Cheryl

mariana's picture
mariana

Hi Cheryl,

 

humidity affects both dough and yeast. Increased humidity softens the dough and it expands with more ease than stiffer, dryer dough would, it won't withstand several rises as well, and is more prone to collapsing. More humid air is also lighter, less dense than dry air, which helps dough to expand.

 

Yeast reacts to increased humidity positively as well, since  additional moisture lowers concentration of alcohol and sugar in dough and makes yeast work stronger and faster.  At ninety percent relative humidity and 115F temperature, dough proofs the fastest. I.e. you should be really paying attention and not miss the point of optimal proofing volume prior to baking.

 

Cinnamon rolls are particularly sensitive to increase in humidity because they are sweet, and sugar is a hygroscopic substance. It absorbs moisture from air very well.

 

So, when it's raining outside and you have no humidity controlled proof box in your baking room, make a drier dough and reduce proofing time slightly, i.e. err on underproofing side. OK?

 

wishing you the best of success,

mariana

ch774's picture
ch774

Thank You so Much...One thing I wished it would STOP Raining I am craving to bake....

This is the best place..

Cheryl

ilabee's picture
ilabee

I am an absolute novice.  Never baked bread before and have heard NOT to do it  on a rainy day.  That's the BEST time to bake however so how do I do this? Thanks 

Larry Clark's picture
Larry Clark

 But as the previous posters have said, you need to make adjustments. On rainy/high humidity days, hold a little of the water out of your dough, mix and add water a little at a time until the dough feels riight. As a new baker, it will take awhile to know what "riight" is, but welcome to the club. We've all had our failures and disappointments. 

Larry