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Baker's percentage - finding total flour weight..

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Larry Clark's picture
Larry Clark

Baker's percentage - finding total flour weight..

I have a  a basic understanding of baker's percentage and use it regularly with sourdough, but now I want to make  a 1000 gr loaf of whole wheat bread using the formula in Reinhart's Bread Baker's Apprentice on pg 272. Coming up with  a total flour weight - or any flour  weight has  baffled me. In dealing with the soaker and poolish, I may have bit off more  than I can chew. Any pointers would be appreciated. 

-Larry

Antilope's picture
Antilope

error

edroid's picture
edroid

Well somebody check my math but this is what I come up with for a 1,000 gram loaf. First column is bakers % as given by Reinhart, second column is weight in grams to make up a 1,000 gram loaf. 

 

Soaker

%

Grams

Flour

100

117.8

Water

141

166.1

Total

241

283.9

 

 

 

Poolish

 

 

Flour

100

186.8

Yeast

0.41

0.8

Water

88.9

166.1

Total

189.3

353.7

 

 

 

Dough

 

 

Soaker

114

283.9

Poolish

142

353.7

Flour

100

249.1

Salt

3.7

9.2

Yeast

1.2

3.0

Honey

16.7

41.6

Oil

5.6

13.9

Egg

18.3

45.6

Total

401.5

1000.0

Larry Clark's picture
Larry Clark

So, how did you come up with 117.8 gr for the soaker?  I trust your math. I thought I knew how  to this (it's been awhile) but obviously not.

edroid's picture
edroid

Well I'm no expert, but this is how I did it. 

If you figure that the bakers percentages are just grams, then the numbers as given by Reinhart would make a loaf totaling 401.5 grams.

That means to make a 1,000 gram loaf, you need to make 2.49 times as much.

As an example, for the soaker, Reinhart uses 114%. Take that times 2.49, and you get 283.9 grams, which is the amount of soaker you will need to have for the bigger loaf. You then need to plug that in to the bakers percentages given for the soaker. To make 283.9 grams of soaker, you need 117.8 grams of flour and 166.1 grams of water. 

Larry Clark's picture
Larry Clark

Okay! Now it's starting to sink in. Thanks. I'm sure I'll have to run through this more than a few times to get comfortable with it.

edroid's picture
edroid

Heh. . . I can't possibly imagine how the ancient egyptians ever baked bread without the use of spreadsheets and  supercomputers! 

Larry Clark's picture
Larry Clark

Thanks for the work you put into this, but I'm still missing something. You said you combined the three parts (241+189.3+401.5) and then what? I can't  come up with any number like 565 gr for total flour. I  do like the idea of combing the parts and using only one overall percentage.

 

mixinator's picture
mixinator

The total dough weight given in the recipe, including soaker and poolish, is 401.5. You want a total dough weight of 1,000. 1000 / 401.5 = 2.49. He multiplied all of the dough ingredients by 2.49.

For the soaker, he took 283.9 (desired weight) / 241 (recipe weight) = 1.178 and multiplied the soaker ingredients by 1.178.

For the poolish, 353.7 / 189.3 = 1.868. Multiply soaker ingredients by 1.868.

The total flour weight is 117.8 + 186.8 + 249.1 = 553.7.

The ancient Egyptians didn't have Peter Reinhart (lucky for them). They just guessed.

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.


It built the pyramids and probably baked their bread, assuming their bread was any good. And mind you, nobody knows if they baked decent bread in ancient Egypt. 

 

mixinator's picture
mixinator

Multiply soaker ingredients by 1.868.

Sorry, that should be multiply poolish ingredients by 1.868. You can't edit posts on this board.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

hydration you can get the total flour weight for 1000 g of dough that does not include the the salt.  If the hydration is 72% then 1000/1.72 = 581 g of flour and 418 g of water.  1 is always the flour and hydration is .72.  Added together you get 1.72.