The Fresh Loaf

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Tartine 70% Whole Wheat with Walnuts

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emkay's picture
emkay

Tartine 70% Whole Wheat with Walnuts

I've been craving a whole wheat loaf lately. After consulting Tartine Bread (aka book #2), I chose to make Chad's whole wheat complet which is 70% whole wheat flour. I increased the final dough's hydration from 80% to 85%. I used a not-so-young levain because I like it sour. Just for kicks I added some lightly toasted walnuts and walnut oil too. Mine didn't turn out as open and hole-y as the non-walnut WW one pictured in the book, but it sure tasted great. It was moist and hearty and filled with tons of walnut goodness.

tartine_ww_walnut_c

Tartine's 70% Whole Wheat with Walnuts

Grams (Baker's Pct)

350 (70%) Whole wheat flour (Whole Foods Organic)

150 (30%) All-purpose flour (Central Milling ABC)

425 (85%) Water

10 (2%) Salt

100 (20%) Levain (100% hydration)

150 (30%) Walnuts (lightly toasted)

10 (2%) Walnut oil

Final dough: 1195 grams

Overall hydration: 86.3%

Prefermented flour: 9.1%

My levain (10 g starter + 50 g water + 50 g flour) was fermented for 12 hours at 70F. Autolysed the flours and water at 70F for 1 hour, then mixed in the levain and salt. After the levain and salt were well incorporated, I mixed in the walnuts and walnut oil. Bulk fermented at 75F for 3.5 hours with stretches and folds every 30 min during the first 2 hours.

tartine_ww_walnut_mix

tartine_ww_walnut_fold

Scaled 850 g for my oval brotform and the rest of the dough for a 3x5-inch loaf pan. Shaped and proofed at 75F. 3 hours for the brotform and 2 hours for the mini loaf pan. Baked the oval at 450F for 40 minutes (with steam during the first 20 minutes).

tartine_ww_walnut_b

tartine_ww_walnut_a

Baked the mini loaf at 450F for 25 minutes.

tartine_ww_walnut_mini_a

tartine_ww_walnut_mini_b

I always seem to have egg whites stashed away in my freezer. I think it's because I use the eggs yolks to make pasta carbonara (which is quite often). All those egg whites give me a perfect excuse to make macarons. Nothing too fancy this time. Plain and simple with a vanilla bean Swiss buttercream.

vanilla_macarons_aug7a

vanilla_macarons_aug7c

vanilla_macarons_aug7b

:) Mary

PS: Submitted to Susan's Yeastspotting.

Comments

Kiseger's picture
Kiseger

Looks super, this must taste so good.  Vanilla bean buttercream, oh wow!  Just baking a tartine bread as I write, walnuts definitely on my list.  Thanks for your post.  

emkay's picture
emkay

The bread did taste great, but I love walnuts so I'm a bit biased. Thanks Kiseger!

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

I don't think he has a whole wheat walnut bread pictured though, so it is not surprising that your crumb is not as open as the one in the book (and that is true regardless of whether you are comparing it to the walnut white country loaf or the non-walnut whole wheat loaf).

I loved the walnut white bread...was one of my favorite breads to date...good to eat straight, buttered or toasted. Even great with peanut butter. (I just checked my blog here and see that the crumb was more open on my loaf, but again, that was using the basic country loaf recipe...and it included white whole wheat instead of regular).

emkay's picture
emkay

You are correct about the picture in the book. I was comparing my walnut WW loaf to his non-walnut WW pic hoping that my crumb with be similar minus the nuts. I will try the WW again, but without the nuts and keep my fingers crossed.  I keep trying to get a bread that is close to what they sell at the bakery, but I'm not quite there yet. BTW, your white country with walnuts looks amazing.

ElPanadero's picture
ElPanadero

looking loaf Mary. Lovely pics too. I've never attempted macaroons, you make it look a doddle but I know it isnt. Might have to give them a go. :) Got a recommended recipe for them?

emkay's picture
emkay

Hi EP,
I've been practicing making macarons on and off for a couple years. Sometimes they look great and sometimes not so much. Either way, they always taste great (even the ugly ones!). There are many recipes out there, but this is the shell recipe that works best for me: http://notsohumblepie.blogspot.com/2010/08/macaron-troubleshooting-new-recipe.html. 

:) Mary

nmygarden's picture
nmygarden

Buy walnut oil.

Beautiful, as we knew it would be. How heavenly to toast a slice and crunch into it! Keep doing what you do, Mary, it's most inspiring!

Cathy

emkay's picture
emkay

Cathy, Walnut oil is great to have around. I use it whenever I can (mostly to justify the cost of buying it). Salad dressings, cakes, breads, marinades. The possibilities are endless. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

of whole wheat!  Just beautiful inside and out.  I love the purple tinge that walnuts, especially with walnut oil, give to the crumb. We love walnuts in bread.  Those macaroons are to die for too.  Well done and

Happy Baking.

emkay's picture
emkay

I do love the purple tinge from the walnuts. I was pretty happy with the crumb considering the amount of WW. I'm going to try to increase the WW to about 80% next time and see how it goes.

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

I love walnuts and wheat, that looks like a wonderful bread!  Any leftovers I might be able to help out with? :)

emkay's picture
emkay

I agree that walnuts and wheat are a great combination. Thanks FlourChild!

ElPanadero's picture
ElPanadero

Some oils are suitable for high heat cooking/baking, many are not. The more healthy oils, cold pressed, full of nutrients, tend to be unsuitable for high heat uses. The governing factor here is the "smoke point" of the oil, the point at which chemical changes occur and harmful substances are created. There are numerous articles to be found on the subject of oil smoke points. Here is one:

http://jonbarron.org/diet-and-nutrition/healthiest-cooking-oil-chart-smoke-points

Knowing the smoke point of an oil is important because heating oil to the point where the oil begins to smoke produces toxic fumes and harmful free radicals

The smoke point of Walnut Oil is listed as follows:

Unrefined Walnut Oil - 160C (320F)
SemiRefined Walnut Oil - 204C (400F)

I need to do more research here in regards to all the oils I have and use. For cooking I always use Rice Bran Oil. Where possible I like to use Hemp Oil for it's nutrition and healthy aspects but only for low temp uses. I would be interested to know if anyone else has more knowledge of all this.

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

The ingredients in your dough never reach a temperature above 212 degrees. There is no reason to worry about the smoke point of the oil mixed in the dough. 

ElPanadero's picture
ElPanadero

Most people bake bread as hot as their ovens will allow. My domestic oven has a highest setting of 240C. Some people's are higher.
When you say 212 degrees I have to assume you mean 212C ? If so that is way beyond the smoke point of unrefined walnut oil (160C) and just beyond that of semirefined oil. Could you elucidate?

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

I am referring to the internal temperature of the bread. Because it is in large part water, you don't get temperatures above the boiling  point.  Like a pot of water on the stove. Put the thermometer on the flame and your probe will melt. Put it in the water and it won't go past 212. 

ElPanadero's picture
ElPanadero

Internal, agreed. External, different matter surely?

Put water on a hot baking stone or preheated dutch oven and it will vapourise instantly. Way hotter than 100C. The bottom of the dough is exposed to that temperature and the whole outside of the loaf is likely far hotter than the inside.

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

Unless you apply be oil to the outside of the dough unmixed it won't hit the smoke point because it is protected by the flour and water. Maybe if you burn the crust you would have a problem but anything charred is unhealthy and we don't usually char dough on purpose. 

emkay's picture
emkay

I don't use my walnut oil as a cooking oil. I mainly use it as a flavoring agent, much like sesame oil. The tiny amount used in marinades where the meat or veg gets cooked probably doesn't pose a threat much greater than any other oil. And I agree with David that it's perfectly fine in baked goods.

isand66's picture
isand66

Mary, what a beautiful loaf and amazing looking macarons.  I think your crumb looks perfect especially for a bread with so much WW and adding walnuts.  I like to add walnut oil to bread as well to add that subtle nutty flavor as well as toasted wheat germ. If you have not tried toasted wheat germ you can buy it at King Arthur Flour if you are interested.

Regards,
Ian

emkay's picture
emkay

Yes, the walnut oil does impart a lovely flavor to the bread. I haven't tried adding toasted wheat germ to doughs yet but I did use some on the outside to help prevent sticking to the form.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

you will be hooked forever!  Dry pan toast some wheat germ with some oat and wheat bran, the sifted out middlings if you grind your own flour and some flax and sesame seeds.  Then grind into a fine powder with the coffee mill.  4% of the flour weight added to any bread makes for a more deep and complex flavor.  Lucy says only thin that comes close to Toadies as a bread flavor enhancer is red malt and if you put red malt into the Toadie mix right before grinding.... then you have a flavor enhancer that is - as good as it gets - with red malt added use 5% of the flour weight. 

Happy Baking

wassisname's picture
wassisname

That's a beauty, Mary!  Nothing quite like a good walnut bread, and this one looks terrific.  What did you use on the outside of the loaf, bran?

Marcus

emkay's picture
emkay

I used a combination of brown rice flour and raw wheat germ on the outside of the loaf. I think I was a bit heavy handed with the germ but I was afraid the loaf would stick to my brotform.