The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Which oil to use and how much?

  • Pin It
justsaying's picture
justsaying

Which oil to use and how much?

Soybean, olive or canola?

And what would be the ratio to flour, for example a 500g bread would need how much oil?

PetraR's picture
PetraR

I use Olive oil and for a 500g bread I use 1-2 tbsp, I do not take it from the amount of Water though.

If I use only wheat bread flour I use 1 tbsp, if I use a mix of wheat bread flour and wholemeal or rye, I use 2 tbsp.

justsaying's picture
justsaying

The so called "virginized" Olive oil?

There are conflicting reports which one is healthier.

 

PetraR's picture
PetraR

I use the extra virgin Olive oil, we like the taste and that is the only Olive oil I use in my house:)

Of course  you can use any other oil if you like.

 

Ford's picture
Ford

As far as I know there is no official designation for "Virginized Olive oil.  I suspect that an inferior grade of olive oil has been treated to remove some "off" flavors and perhaps had chlorophyl added for color.  

For a description of the grades of olive oil see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extra_virgin_olive_oil#Commercial_grades.

Ford

ghazi's picture
ghazi

Depends if you want the flavor to come through in your bread, if you use sunflower oil for instance its neutral. Any oil/fat pretty much does the same thing. Softens and keep bread little longer

 

Ford's picture
Ford

I like the flavor of butter, so when I add fat to the recipe I use about 3.7% butter based on the flour.

justsaying's picture
justsaying

Oh, so you're saying if there already is butter there is no need for oil?

Because both contain much fat which serves to make the bread last longer among other things?

Ford's picture
Ford

That is my take.  It is not "wrong" to use both, if you want to, and the dough can take it.

Ford

Gail_NK's picture
Gail_NK

If your only choices are olive oil, soy oil, or canola - go with olive oil, unless you use organic. Soy and canola are almost always genetically engineered. As is cotton seed oil. If you go for butter, make sure it's Non-BST - no growth hormones - those are also genetically engineered. As far as I know sunflower and peanut oil are not GE, yet, anyway.

We are strictly organic in our household - for grains and flour especially because conventional grain farmers can use herbicides to "aid in ripening" - or desiccate - the grain so it all ripens at the same time. They essentially kill it. And the herbicides are not ever washed off. We've also found that organic flour is more "lively" and makes terrific starter and wonderful bread!

You might be interested in some of the articles on grain, flour, baking, and bakers that we have published on GoodFood World:

http://www.goodfoodworld.com/bakers-and-baking/

http://www.goodfoodworld.com/from-grain-to-bread/

Enjoy and happy baking!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

You will find a great amount of variation in each type of oil.  So dig out your little shot glasses and taste your oils.  

Just like there are different grains and nuts, there are different olives and different growing regions.  Some olive oils can taste spicy, other nutty, green or lemony and some have smooth flavour while others have a distinct taste or bite after being swallowed.  Some are better in salads and dips than used in baking.  I have one olive oil that tastes buttery when boiled on top of boiling pasta, a very pleasant surprise!  Another that finishes off with hazel nut hints.  Get together with friends and compare and stretch your imagination in their usages. 

Be discerning and taste your oils.  That should tell you more about which oil to use and how much.  

 

Patf's picture
Patf

Is what I use. It is almost flavour - less.

I had to look up canola, found it's from rapeseed.

From personal taste, I wouldn't use olive oil, it's too strongly flavoured for me, others might love it.

Patf's picture
Patf

for 1 kilo flour I use 3 tablespoonsful, more than average I think. Again, it's a matte of taste.