The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Passwords difficulties

  • Pin It
Jim Burgin's picture
Jim Burgin

Passwords difficulties

Love the site!!

1.  When I enter the site from my desktop computer, I find that I am automatically logged in and do not have to enter my user name and password.

2.  When I try to enter the site from my tablet, the site will not accept the user name and password I have established at my desk top computer.  I get a message asking if I want to change my password.

3.  Do you have to have different user name and password for EACH hardware you use to access the site?

Help please!

Thanks much,  Jim Burgin

Comments

Floydm's picture
Floydm

No.

Be sure, on your tablet, you are going to thefreshloaf.com/user/login to login. On your computer, reset your password one more time just to make sure you know what it is. It is case sensitive.

Jim Burgin's picture
Jim Burgin

Floydm,

Thanks for writing.  I did EXACTLY as you suggested.  Still get the message, "Sorry, unrecognized username or password.  Have you forgotten your password?  Do you know, is there a person I can call, at the site, about this.Thanks again,  Jim Burgin

Floydm's picture
Floydm

There is no person or staff at the site.

There has to be a typo or a space or a case difference somewhere.

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

Sometimes this site is not overly friendly to mobile devices. You might try changing the browser you are using on your tablet and see if that solves the problem.

Jim Burgin's picture
Jim Burgin

Thanks David.  I will keep working on this  Jim Burgin

ElPanadero's picture
ElPanadero

"I find that I am automatically logged in and do not have to enter my user name and password"

This is incredibly bad practice imo. It leaves your PC vulnerable to viruses that can easily go and find the place in Windows where all your passwords have been remembered. My guess is that the problems you are having are due to you having tried to change passwords a few times but since your PC settings are remembering your passwords you don't have to type them in correctly. If you did you'd probably find where the problem is.

My recommendation is that you disable the function in Internet Explorer that saves logins and passwords. Using it simply makes YOU lazy, such that you can't remember all your different passwords and thus become dependent on the PC doing all the work for you. However as I said earlier, it leaves you open to viruses and other troubles.

If you are willing to disable the feature then follow these instructions:

(note that in doing this you will clear all stored references to your logins and passwords so you wil need to be sure that you know them all - which imo you should do anyway)

1. From IE select Tools - Internet Options
2. Go to the Content Tab in the pop up
3. Click the Settings button forthe AutoComplete section
4. Uncheck every box in there
5. Click the Delete AutoComplete History to remove all record of past passwords etc

Note: if you are unsure of all your logins and passwords and would rather not delete all the references to them then skip number 5 above.

With the above all done, now go to the Fresh Loaf site. Go to the Home page and click the Log In link. It should then ask you for your login and password. You will then see if your login and password are what you think they are.

If you have trouble logging in it's because your password isn't what you thought it was. Go for a password reset at this point and go from there.

If you do manage to login successfully and the tablet is still showing problems then it is likely a setting on the tablet.

EP

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

I have 134 unique passwords with an average password length of 12 characters. I think that it is harsh to call someone lazy just because they use a program to remember passwords.

There are risks, to be sure, of using programs to assist one with passwords. But, there area also risks when one relies solely on their memory since memorable passwords tend to be far weaker and duplicated from site to site.

Also, for what it is worth, I believe the site uses cookies to remember passwords...I don't use autocomplete on my browser, and I am rarely asked for my password when I access the site from my PC.

ElPanadero's picture
ElPanadero

I appreciate where you are coming from but I still disagree.  I should say also that I tend to run my browser on med-high security settings and I always have Active Scripting disabled by default which prevents a plethora of marketing and nuisance popups when you visit webpages.  It also makes websites run about 10 times faster.  When needed I re-enable scripting temporarily.

The problem of how to memorise 100s of passwords has a number of solutions.  Writing them down is highly undesirable whether that be on paper or electronically, and allowing a device's opertaing system, esp Windows to maintain a list of them is, imho, complete lunacy.

Is there another way ?  Yes I think there is.   You can create for yourself an algorithm or pattern for each of your passwords that allows you to deduce your password instead of remembering it.  A very basic example of this could be to create 2 part passwords with one part being a unique code that you will use for all your passwords and the other part having something to do with the website.  e.g. if your chosen code is XT17

XT17RBS - for your online banking with RBS

XT17TFL - for The Fresh Loaf

and so on.  Obviously this is a basic algorithm but even so, you could deduce your password for any website without having to remember anything.  You can make much more complex algorithms of course.  You might argue that if someone discovered one of your passwords they could deduce the rest but TBH if your password is somehow discoverable then there is something terribly wrong already.  The complexity of your algorithm can of course prevent this.  You could for example substitute letters, say using the letter 2 letters forward in the alphabet.  So RBS becomes TDU.  So the password becomes XT17TDU.  Not much there to suggest an algorithm to anyone.  Anyway, I'm sure you get the idea.   Beats trying to remember 100s of passwords or writing them down.

I would say in my defence, that as an ex-IT professional, no-end of friends and relatives have at times asked me to configure their home broadbands for them and / or resolve problems with devices like iPads that they have difficulty connecting.  In many many cases my efforts are totally scuppered because the people in question can never remember either their router logins and passwords or their ISP logins and passords and pretty much 99% of the time out comes some little notepad, often stored in the computer desk itself where all these passwords are written down.  Madness !  and so unnecessary if you use algorithms.

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

"but TBH if your password is somehow discoverable then there is something terribly wrong already."

Yes, indeed. And more often than not it is because some website was hacked and the passwords were not encrypted and were otherwise let loose, from which point it is only a matter of time before any duplicate password is subject to discovery, particularly if you happen to use the same username across websites that have the same password.

I don't care what algorithm you may be running in your head, if I know your username and password for one site, it is not going to take more than 6 seconds for a computer to crack the rest of your passwords based on that in-your-head algorithm.

Granted, the risk is small, but not so small that I would not change every single password once I was alerted to the fact that one site let the cat out of the bag.

 

ElPanadero's picture
ElPanadero

if I know your username and password for one site, it is not going to take more than 6 seconds for a computer to crack the rest of your passwords based on that in-your-head algorithm.

That seems unlikely to me.  Your login names will be different on every site.  It's not the login names that we generally forget, its the passwords.  For example, I am only ELPanadero on this site.  It's not a login name I am likely to forget.  Other sites like banks tend to enforce particular login names perhaps using Date Of Birth and code numbers etc.   Also a computer would have to know that an algorithm was used to generate the password.  Why would it assume this?  and what could it deduce from a password like XT17TDU ?  How would it know which part was the constant code (XT17) and which the deducable part?   It would really be reliant on using brute force techniques and for serious website like banks, the account would be locked out after 3 attempts.  All risks aside, I think using a reasonable complex algorithm is the best solution to the human problem of trying to remember 100s of strong passwords.

Also I agree with you entirely that if one of your accounts does get compromised, then I'd go and change all my passwords everywhere else (once I was sure my PC was clean of any viruses).

Jim Burgin's picture
Jim Burgin

Thanks much ElPanadero,

For your thoughtful reply.  I am about to look into doing what you suggest.

Best,

Jim Burgin

 

Jim Burgin's picture
Jim Burgin

ElPanadero,

Thank you so very much.  I did as you suggested and am now able to log in flawlessly on both my desk top and tablet!  Best wishes.

Jim Burgin

Jim Burgin's picture
Jim Burgin

ElPanadero,

Thank you so very much.  I did as you suggested and am now able to log into the site on both my desktop and tablet!  Best wishes.

Jim Burgin

ElPanadero's picture
ElPanadero

Glad you are sorted. Enjoy the site.