The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sourdough Help

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Jamila's picture
Jamila

Sourdough Help

Hello everyone,

 

I'm very interested on how about getting my sourdough starter to taste more... sour...

 

It is my first ever, and I guess it's about 1 or so months old now. It bubbles well while it's in the ice box, but it doesn't have much flavor when I use it.

 

Suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

 

Thank you,

Jamila 

demegrad's picture
demegrad

You can try making a stiff sourdough starter.  I just read a book called Handbook of Dough Fermentations, and at many times it points to facts that lead to the belief that stiff sourdoughs with a hydration around 60% favor the production of acetic acid which is far stronger tasting than lactic acid.  Basically make your starter into the consistency of regular dough, then knead it in when you make your mix up the dough.  Let it rise twice at room temperature (the room temperature thing is actually important), then divide and shape and put it into whatever proofing device of your choice.  Cover it with plastic wrap and store it in the fridge, at this point its probably fairly late at night, so just wait until tomorrow (12-24 hours), pull it out of the fridge it should be fairly well risen already but let it warm up and proof a little more for about 2 hours, then into a preheated oven.  The combination of the stiff starter, two room temperature bulk fermentations, and a long slow final proof should get you a really sour bread.  Just be wary of the fact that the larger amount of acid can start to break down the gluten network, so handle with extreme care, or just let it go through its final proof in an appropriate sized cake round and start the baking process with the dough in the pan, then after about 15-20 minutes you should be able to move the bread from the cake pan directly onto the baking stone or wire rack to get a good crust.  This cake round method makes moving the dough into the oven very easy without much worry of deflating. 

demegrad

http://www.demegrad.blogspot.com

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I would not even try to make my starter more sour (a possible sign it's under fed).  i would work on making the loaf more sour.  Increasing your pre-fermenting times at warmer room temperatures is a good place to start.  There is a lot of debate here on what makes a loaf sour or less sour and sometimes it appears to come down to the strain of wee beasties in the starter itself.  My firm starters are not sour themselves, but when mixed with water and flour and left out to poolish overnight, develop sourness.  Does that help you?  --Mini Oven

Jamila's picture
Jamila

I will try both suggestions and see what happens.

 

Thank you again!