The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Malthouse loaf

ghazi's picture
ghazi

Malthouse loaf

Made this yesterday and the results were a little weird if not very different to what I am used to

Left the flour/water to autolyse for 2 days, since starter wasn't ready to go. It was sitting at around 70F sometimes little higher sometimes lower. I wonder if this made a difference to the color of the crumb, im thinking oxidizing here not sure exactly what happened though it was quite a weird loaf.

430g malthouse flour

275g water

90g starter (50% hydration)

8g salt

Mixed the rest of ingrediatns and kneaded a little about 5 minutes. (do you have to need when doing long autolyse)

Did 3 S & F , then dipped in milk +  covered in oatmeal for shaping.

All the malthouse loaves I see online are much lighter in color.

PetraR's picture
PetraR

I never made a loaf like that but to me the colour looks very good.

What did you mean when you said * the Starter was not ready *?

 

ghazi's picture
ghazi

The starter was still fermenting, wanted it to have eaten most of the food.

I cut the loaf just 5 minutes after coming out, couldn't resist. Its just that it was very dark , I think it had something to do with the flour/water being left for so long together to gel. Otherwise the taste was nice though when I look online all other malthouse loaves are lighter in crumb. Anyway this is fast becoming my favourute bread with the added oatmeal really gives it an intersitng texture. Very wholesome

Im going to try it again, some people say to autolyse only 30 min - 2 hrs some say 2 days . I guess putting in the fridge is a safe option if longer. I mean isn't dough just sitting mixed simply a good way to improve flavor and the longer the better? that's my perception.

With anything low and slow count me in

 

PetraR's picture
PetraR

I autoyse no longer than max. 50 minutes but I do bulkferment for 12 - 48 hours, the finall proof only 2-2.5 hours.

I think the longer the bulkferment the better the bread.

Right now I do just 8  hours because my 2 older Sons are home, they just finished University and now we are 6 people again and I am baking and baking and baking.... lol

ghazi's picture
ghazi

I think your right, since most flavor comes from bulk ferment. Autolyse is just there to begin the process and breakdown the gluten somewhat for less kneading. Thanks for your input Petra

Seems like you need lots of bread for your house:) If only you could do longer ferments all the time. Life isn't always like that I guess

All the best

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I have never heard of malthouse flour so I googled it. It looks quite delicious and wish it was available here. You must be "across the pond" in the UK?

Here is the link for anyone else wondering what it was.

http://www.dovesfarm.co.uk/flour-and-ingredients/organic-malthouse-bread-flour-x-1kg/

When flour and water are mixed (even without a leavener added) there is still natural yeast activity present and other reactions going on.

Whew! Autolysed for 2 days! I guess the whole grain had time to hydrate! Did you have to add additional water when you finally added the starter or was your starter hydration high enough to compensate? Also, you don't mention how long you bulk fermented. As written, it looks like you had the flour/water mixed together for 2 days and then added the ingredients, a few S&F (with what timing?) and popped it in the oven.

Whole grain of all kinds benefit greatly from 3 things:

1. Adequate liquid in the recipe (looks like you have this)

2. Adequate time for all the bran bits to absorb the water (you've got that)

3. Adequate development of the starch and gluten in the dough. (Not so sure you have this)

Additionally, all bread benefits from:

4. Adequate bulk fermentation (not sure you have this). Bulk fermentation is when the flavor is developed by the yeast digesting the sugars in the flour-too little and it tastes rather pasty, too much and it doesn't rise during the proof.

5. Adequate proof (not overproofed and not underproofed-look up "finger poke test). (This wasn't addressed in the original post. The loaf looks dense but that can be from any of the above.)

Incorporate these ideas into the next loaf and see if you like the changes.

Enjoy!

 

ghazi's picture
ghazi

Thank you for your response. Ive noted down your information for my next bake. With S & F I usually space them between 30 min each with around 4, and then let rise until double. I think your right about it hasn't risen to full potential during bulk ferment so that's adding to my problem. No water added during final mixing with only the starter used as a pre ferment . Roughly 63% hydration.

Yes, final proof probably wasn't up to potential. Looking at it seems the main problem comes from bulk fermenting and probably no enough gluten development

I really should give baking a break for a day or two, its difficult to not end up making another batch. Im all after consistency and this is what I hope to achive at some stage.

Thank you for your help

Ghazi

clazar123's picture
clazar123

You will achieve what you want as long as you make note of what you have done and where you want to go and make appropriate changes.

Whole Grain flour needs much higher percentages than white flour breads. 63% sounds much too low.The dough is so thick that it will not relax enough to allow the gluten to stretch and accommodate bubbles. Give it a little more stretchability/lubrication with additional water. Try increasing the water until you have a sticky dough that will change to a tacky/sticky dough after the autolyse.

And watch the bench flour. Because of the rye, it will be sticky no matter how much bench flour. If you have added enough bench flour to a rye-containing dough to make it NOT sticky-you have added way too much flour. Use either oiled or wet hands and a bench scraper to handle. Easier since you are doing S&F. 

ghazi's picture
ghazi

Thank you very much for your advice, you have inspired me to keep going. Very good info:)

Ghazi