The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Applause for JMonkey

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Ramona's picture
Ramona

Applause for JMonkey

I want to thank you so much for that recipe.  I actually was successful!  I was starting to wonder if I would ever get a decent loaf of bread.  The loaves looked good and tasted good and had a good texture.  My family was very impressed.  I left the soaker and the sponge on the counter, as you said I could (I did add the salt to the soaker also).  They weren't a dough though, like I expectd, but I just added some more flour with the other ingredients the next day.  I ended up with two loaves, not one, but everything turned out really well.  The only thing I did alter was I added about 1/4 cup of honey, instead of 2 Tbs. and 2 Tbs. of butter, instead of 1 Tbs.  I can't put pictures on here though of the bread, I have no idea how to do that.  I knew going into this that I was taking the hard way by only wanting to bake whole grains, but I also knew there was a way.  I would like to make a rye bread, marbled rye, and a pumpkernickle bread, if you have any recipes for these without having to use a white flour or all purpose, then I would greatly appreciate it.  Thanks again!

Cooky's picture
Cooky

 No white flour, just rye and WW. 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/3202/iso-one-great-rye-bread-recipe

 The whole thread contains a ton of information about ryes, which are sure to make you very, very hungry.

 

 

"I am not a cook. But I am sorta cooky."

JMonkey's picture
JMonkey

I'm glad it worked! It's a great recipe, but the real thanks should go to Peter Reinhart. It's very close, I think, to the basic whole wheat sandwich bread he has in his book. The "epoxy method" where you use a soaker and a pre-ferment is all his -- it's amazing what it does to the flavor of whole grain breads.

I haven't seen his new book yet, alas. Loved ones have told me in no uncertain terms that I am NOT to purchase it before my birthday in October, so I'll just have to wait, I guess. But I was a tester, like many others on this board, and I learned an awful lot.

There's a lot on rye, I believe, in the book. I'd HIGHLY recommend picking it up.

Ramona's picture
Ramona

I did pick up The Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book today and it sounds exactly what I need.  You know years ago, I looked at this book because it had been recommended, but when I did I  just wasn't understanding what a sponge was and couldn't make out the information this person was saying to me and what this book was saying.  I couldn't understand how do you soak grains and then grind them?  I didn't realize until I came on this site and read through so much of the material from all of your comments that the grain is ground first and then made into a sponge.  I finally got it.  So, while I was there, I did look at Peter's book and I am very impressed and am planning on getting it in a couple of weeks.  I think I will be set then. 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I think we will be hearing often from you as you progress along your bread journey.  (Isn't a sponge that thing one washes dishes with?)   Happy wandering!   :)  from Mini O

andrew_l's picture
andrew_l

I've read this thread ABOUT using a soaker - but can't find the actual recipe? Is it on here??!
Andrew

browndog's picture
browndog
andrew_l's picture
andrew_l

for that link! It looks a very interesting idea - I'm going to try my usual (and favourite) recipe, but using a soaker overnight and see what happens! 
Andrew