The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

what did bread look like?

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jim_bikerider's picture
jim_bikerider

what did bread look like?

I'm pretty new to the bread culture (so to speak). I understand the bakers yeast is a relatively new (in the last 100 years) development. Prior to that, loaves were built using natural starters.

What did bread look like in 1900? Were loaf pans used? I read somewhere that bread was sold by the pound, and it got me wondering about the whole bread process 100 years ago.

Thanks for your time,

Jim 

Antilope's picture
Antilope

.The first e-book has color plates with pictures of bread from around the world in 1903. The second e-book is an illustrated equipment supply catalog for bakeries from 1907 showing equipment, pans, etc. You can download the first book in PDF by clicking on the "gear" symbol on the upper right of the page. The second book can be downloaded in various file formats on the left hand side of the page.


**The Baker's Book: A Practical Hand Book of the Baking Industry in All Countries - By Emil Braun 1903 - Many Illustrations and color plates
(click on "Gear" on right to download PDF file)
http://books.google.com/books?id=4TDSjgtdq24C&dq=Baking%20Industry&pg=PA297#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

**Illustrated Bakery Equipment Catalog (1907 ca.)
https://archive.org/details/catalog00bruc

 

**Color Pictures of 1881 Cookies and Crackers (Baker's illustrated color catalog of cookies & crackers baked goods)

Here's a link to the "Descriptive sample book of goods manufactured" by Dozier-Weyl cracker co. St. Louis, Mo.
Published 1881. You can read it online or download PDF, EPUB, MOBI files for free at these links:
.
Link to online readable book
http://www.archive.org/stream/descriptivesampl00dozi#page/n1/mode/2up
.
Link to Open Library listing of book:
https://openlibrary.org/books/OL23664487M/Descriptive_sample_book_of_goods_manufactured_by_Dozier-Weyl_cracker_co.

 

**Ryzon Baking Powder Cook Book - with color illustrations (1917)
https://archive.org/details/cu31924089597227

jim_bikerider's picture
jim_bikerider

Thanks Antilope, this is very good information.

Jim

BetsyMePoocho's picture
BetsyMePoocho

Antilope,

I love this stuff.  It's like going back in time…. Thanks for the effort in compiling such an enjoyable journey for us!

May your Lame always be sharp----

Antilope's picture
Antilope

I enjoy finding all of these old baking related documents and sharing them. I'm amazed at the beautiful bread and pastries they made 100 years ago.

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

Bread pans, very much the size and shape, including Pullman type pans, in use today have been in common use since the early 1700s. Likewise, yeast in the cities was commonly the same yeast as in today's dry yeast; just a different form, a wet paste. It was supplied by brewers to the bakers at least as far back as the middle ages, and likely as far back as 3000 years ago or more. After  all, beer preceded bread, and for good reason.

The question isn't related so much to time as it is to urban vs rural place.

cheers,

gary

jim_bikerider's picture
jim_bikerider

Thanks to all for their information.  I have plenty to study up on now.

 

Cheers,

 

Jim