The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Heat & Humidity

Wysteria's picture
Wysteria

Heat & Humidity

HELP! I have to go save my dough!

 

Ok, phew that was a close call!  I am making french bread today. The recipe is 4 cups flour, 2 tsp yeast, 1 1/2 cup water and 2 tsp salt.   It was supposed to rise for 1.5 hours before it doubled.  Mine doubled in 45 minutes and continued to rise!  Right as I sat down to write this I just realized it had decided to try and tripple and had to go punch it down and get it ready for it's second rise. (only 30 minutes).  It's about 85 or 90 today and slightly humid. I live in Maryland near the bay (so I am also really low altitude wise).  I wasn't sure how much humidity affects dough? I tend to shy away from a/c unless it's absolutely necessary (so it's not on today).  I made a second batch and it's doing about the same thing (rising in 45 minutes).  I would appreciate ANY thoughts!

 

By the way this is my first post on here. I have been reading and doing the lessons for about 2 months now I guess. I love baking bread and am obsessed with artisan bread. My favoite bakery is located in my home town in Vermont. They are called "Red Hen Baking Company" (http://www.redhenbaking.com/) if you want to check them out.  The dentists in the area have been fixing a lot more broken teeth since they came along!  Their bread is amazing though!  If you are ever in the area I HIGHLY recommend them! 

 

Anyway thanks for this site it's GREAT! I really appreciate all the hard work put into the Bread Feed as well as the other sections!

 

Thanks!

Wysteria 

rcornwall's picture
rcornwall

When I am baking under similar conditions I have the same result. Yeast tends to thrive faster when the temp gets above 75 f. It will thrive faster and faster until it gets over 95 f. Then the yeast may start to die. A proof bax in a commercial kitchen has a humidity control. When the humidity is higher, it softens the bread and makes it a little easier for the yeast to grow with less resistance. If you want to control the fermentation time you could retard the dough or you could use less yeast. Remember you only want as much yeast as you need to get your desired results. There is a formula you can use to accurately adjust yeast and its fermentation time. Divide your old fermentation time by your new desired fermentaion time. Then multiply that times the old yeast quantity. This will equal your new yeast quantity. It works very well unless you are making very large volumes of dough. Then other factors come into play. I hope this helps.

Good luck.

rcornwall

Wysteria's picture
Wysteria

Thank you! I appreciate the respond. I guess what I don't understand is when I would need to use that formula?  When it's hot and humid? How do I gauge if it's hot enough or humid enough?

 

The bread came out wonderfully by the way!  

 

Wysteria 

SDbaker's picture
SDbaker

You may also have success by adjusting the initial water temp using the formula disucessed on the SFBI thread.  I am not savvy enough to place a link here.  Best of luck,

SD Baker

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Anybody can. Maybe there is an easier way but this is what I did. I wanted to make a link. So I typed the word I want to use for it. Let's type a word.... LINK. Then I went to the site I wanted to link it to. I highlighted the http:// and all (click and drag) then I copied it to my notepad (with my Mac, I typed "Apple" "c") then I used the backpage arrow function till I was back to my comment, this comment. Then I put my curser on to the word LINK above and highlight it (click and drag mouse). The little link things hi-light just in the tool bar of this comment and I click on the first one, a window appears and I click on the Link URL and copy ("apple" "v") from my notepad into the blank. Then click on the INSERT button. Presto! When you hit the preview button or the post comment button at the bottom of the page, it's all set up.

By the way where are you SDBaker?  Still in S.C.?   

demegrad's picture
demegrad

I couldn't find the exact site that SDBaker is speaking of but this one is close:SFBI Baking Tips

 

demegrad

http://www.demegrad.blogspot.com

Wysteria's picture
Wysteria

Thanks for everyones help!  I appreciate it!

 

Wysteria