The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Gluten free

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Baker Frank's picture
Baker Frank

Gluten free

One family members has developed celiac disease, another a gluten sensitivity, another 2 now have diabetes, and another wants to eat less gluten. I love the breads, pizza, and flat breads I make and I take a great deal of pride when they come out well and are enjoyed by others.

I have my doubts about being able to bake quality gluten free recipes that resemble the qualities I associate with recipes that have gluten. I hope to make a gluten free pizza, artisan bread, and a baguette for an upcoming family event.

I would appreciate it if a fellow contributor could advise me in this endeavor.

Thank you,

Frank

clazar123's picture
clazar123

There is a learning curve to be climbed on this subject. One of the forums here is "Baking for Special Needs". Start there.

GF baking is like baking any bread. It takes a while to get familiar with the ingredients, how they behave and how to get the best out of them. You wouldn't expect a 100% whole rye loaf to be the same in taste and texture as a 100% AP white flour loaf. The same applies to GF.  In general, the GF items can be made very deliciously but they will be different in texture and taste from wheat based products. My best advice is to start with the idea you want to make a delicious GF pizza crust-not a GF crust just like my delicious wheat based crust.

Have fun-bake often and love what you bake.Even bricks have their use.

 

 

Baker Frank's picture
Baker Frank

clazar123

What great advice you offered. I liked very much how you shaped your response! Thank you for offering a place to learn more about GF. Yes it is important to find quality within GF rather than try to achieve something that only wheat based products can offer.

Regards,

Frank