The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Macarons

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johnluke's picture
johnluke

Macarons

Not sure if this should be in the "General" forum. Is there anything I can use in place of almond flour that will have a neutral taste? I have used cornmeal, peanuts, coconut, and pumpkin seeds. The peanuts were roasted so, maybe raw ones will give a blander taste. Would rice flour work or a type of starch like potato?

 

* The issue is not a nut allergy or inability to find the almonds. I am just looking for a cheaper alternative.

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Sweet sorghum flour or millet flour or brown rice flour.  None of them are entirely "neutral" but you may find that their flavors are mild enough to suit your taste.  You might also want to try blending several flours toghether to achieve a flavor profile that you like.

Paul

johnluke's picture
johnluke

Thanks.

Have you tried any of these? Just wondering if you preferred any and if the ratio replacement of almond flour would be 1:1.

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

So I really can't say what the replacement ratios might be.  Yes, I have baked with all of those flours and enjoyed the taste of the resulting breads.

Paul

disastrophe's picture
disastrophe

I have tried replacing almond flour with coconut flour and ground white sesame seeds (50:50) which worked (suggested from the Baking Obsession blog) and I have also tried ground pepitas (shelled pumpkin seeds) suggested by the Bravetart.  They both work ok.  I tried 100% ground sesame once and the batter seemed too runny and it was hard to pipe.

Lovely's picture
Lovely

Almonds flour is the basic of macarons but it can be replaced by other nuts such as pistachios or hazelnuts flour ; however I've been hearing that Almond flour is healthier than the others (digestive wellness...) Have you ever heard about it?

thymetobake.com's picture
thymetobake.com

Here is a recipe for a macaron with rice flour at http://bravetart.com/recipes/Macarons (you just substitute the almond flour with the rice flour in exact amounts).  The rice flour gives the macaron a slightly sandy texture but the flavor is still wonderful; you may have to lower your baking temperature a bit (when I tried this recipe I had to lower my oven temperature from the usual 300 F that I had baked my macarons at previously to 250 F).  My first batch baked at the recipe's recommended temperature of 300 F cracked, and came out quite badly; the second batch baked at 250 F came out almost perfectly, with feet and no cracks at all.  You may have to experiment with your oven temperatures a bit at first.