The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

I made a * flat * bread lol -OR- Do not rush your dough

PetraR's picture
PetraR

I made a * flat * bread lol -OR- Do not rush your dough

So I am not sure why it happened and not to worried about at the moment, unless it happens again *  it gave me such a laugh.

I used the same amount of Starter, Flour, Water BUT this time I used my Stand mixer as I was a bit in a hurry.

The Bulk fermentation was rushed * only about 5 hours * but the final proof was 2.5 hours.

So all not good I know.

I shaped the dough after it had doubled, put in the banneton *While the family was asking when they can have bread *

Turned it out on Parchment Paper, scored, put it in hot Dutch Oven and baked as usual.

When I took the Lid off it was quick, so I did not really look BUT when it was time to get the bread out ....

My oldest Son just looked at * it * and said : oooooooook Mum, what did  you do to get the bread so flat?

Mind you, the taste was wonderful, it really is, the crumb was moist and not at all dense.

It was a rushed bread and it did show me that it does not want to be rushed. 

 

It this happens next time with the long Bulk fermentation over Night I shall ask for help, right now I am ok, it was a one off * I hope *

My Husband and the other kids gobbled the bread up to quick before I had a chance to make a picture, well, only a bit was left over , I could have... darn it lol

AZ Chuck's picture
AZ Chuck

That happened to me and I blamed over proofing. Sliced up and toasted it made the best bread sticks.  

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

In sourdough breads this can be caused by either underproofing or overproofing.  If the dough is not allowed full development in the bulk fermentation then the final proof will likely be inadequate.  The underproofed dough simply will not rise enough in the oven.  On the other side of things, overproofing will most definitely bring about flat breads.  Hard to say in this case without knowing the details of the recipe but my guess is that the dough was underproofed.

Jeff

PetraR's picture
PetraR

... was under proofed.

I do not mind though, this is the first time it happend.

The taste is wonderful, that is what matters after all:)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

the dough temp and possibly speed fermentation but if I really have to turn out a bread fast, add instant yeast to the final dough and use a larger amount of starter made quickly using warm water and kept rather runny.  Even late in the process, when the starter is ready to mix up dough, if you add warm water to thin, stir well giving one to two Tbspoons of recipe flour (or better yet, altus or day old bread) it can speed up the whole batch if allowed to ferment for just an hour before mixing up the dough.  I will even heat up a heavy mixer bowl with (can hold your hand in it) warm water to bulk raise the dough.  Then watch your dough carefully!

I have a lot of extra yeast to use up and am experimenting (ideas welcome)...  I took one teaspoon of yeast and added water, was surprised how much water I added to make a simple paste.  So I would suggest adding a tablespoon of water when adding an additional teaspoon of yeast to a recipe.  

 

PetraR's picture
PetraR

... I shall not use the Stand Mixer for Sourdough again.

I have a Kennwood Chef and used the lowest possible speed , on my dial it is minium and well under 1, I only used it for about 7 minutes.

I believe that it was rushed so the bulk fermentation was to short and the final proof for the size of the dough too.

250g wheat flour

250g wholemeal flour

100g Rye flour

10g Salt

400g Water

Mind you, I ordered fresh yeast and did not realise what  a short shelf life it has, mine is Organic and not suitable for the freezer.

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

???

PetraR's picture
PetraR

I do use it for all other bakes but not Sourdough again.

It was not the reason why the bread gone flat but I prefer to S&F when making Sourdough bread.

 

doughooker's picture
doughooker

Simply tell them to enjoy their sourdough pancake.

PetraR's picture
PetraR

I did not have to tell them though, the loved it, they where just wondering why it was so flat because my bread usually rises very well.

AZ Chuck's picture
AZ Chuck

When you over proof, can you punch it down and let it proof again? I usually just put it some container and live with it.

alfanso's picture
alfanso

Over proofing is a sign that the yeast has expired its food source.  'Punch down' (uggh, I so dislike that term) is designed to strengthen the gluten structure and provide fresh food for the still active yeast.

alan

Bob Marley's picture
Bob Marley

Avoid the term "punch down".  Rather, use the term "gently deflate" and one need not deflate all of the way.

PetraR's picture
PetraR

Mine was not over proofed though, it was under proofed and that is how it happend.

My bread usually rises very well, this was the first time.

I shall never rush it again.

My other bread dough just gone in the fridge until tomorrow Morning:)

 

PetraR's picture
PetraR

Yes, you can degas the dough and let it poof again, but mine was under proofed when I did the bulk fermentation, and I did not do enough of the final proof as I was rushing it.

 

 

doughooker's picture
doughooker

if I really have to turn out a bread fast, add instant yeast to the final dough and use a larger amount of starter made quickly

Starter can't be made quickly.

If you need bread in a hurry, why not save your starter and make a yeasted loaf from the outset?

Her dough was underproofed. No mystery there. Stuff happens.