The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

No Farmer's Market (Grain de Orge take 1/2, sfbi finish rye, SpeltSD)

  • Pin It
golgi70's picture
golgi70

No Farmer's Market (Grain de Orge take 1/2, sfbi finish rye, SpeltSD)

The highly anticipated Oysterfest took place today and is the biggest draw up to this neck of this "woods", as far as events go.  There's beer and numerous vendors of oyster's in many different styles.  I'm not an oyster guy but apparently some of the world's best oysters come from right here.  There's an oyster eating competitions and all of the restaurants that vend compete for "best oyster" each year.  Many thousands gather and it's quite the spectacle.  

This doesn't cancel the Farmer's Market but moves it to another location and makes it tough to get around downtown so i skipped it.  I did my Tuesday bake of Spelt SD since many of my contributors/tasters made a point to give it high regard. Only change was I used all freshly milled whole grain spelt.  You can find the formula here. http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/38592/farmers-market-week-33-sesame-wheat-tuesday-bake

I got my eye caught on the formula in the back of the most recent Breadlines, Grain de Lin by Steve Scott of Babette's Artisan Bread.  I added it to my Tuesday bake since the oven would be on anyway.  I made a few needed changes to the formula.  I didn't have enough flax and it was a last minute decision to make so i decided to use pearled barley I bought recently for experimenting.  The formula calls for T65 and AP but I don't have any T65.  To balance i used CM's T85 along with CM's bakers craft  and increased the proportion of white to HE to try and get something similar.  

This bread is fantastic.  Sweet and creamy; custard creamy.  A mild tang to balance.  The crust shatters and stays crunchy for 3 days.  It actually evolved quite nicely in similar fashion to a miche.  Since I enjoyed it so much i wanted a second shot.  On my first attempt I had some sticking issues during loading and from the proofing bowls.  i floured bowls more liberally and loaded the loaves using a piece of parchment to be sure it wouldn't stick to the peel.  This is some wet dough.  I got much better profile on the second wave and all else remained roughly the same.  This bread is a new favorite.  Now I gotta get some flax and try the true formula.  

And finally I tried the SFBI Finnish Rye which David Snyder has shared a few times.  You can see David's link here http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/36856/finnish-rye-sfbi.  Again I was forced to make a couple changes.  I had only half of the flax needed so i replaced the other half with some hemp hearts that were hanging around.  I also used both a liquid levain and rye sour (my discard from feeding this morning) as this too was a last second bake.  After tasting I don't think these alterations made too much variance from the formula.  

David's tasting notes are the same as mine so far.  Very molassesy (not a word).  But he says balance comes tomorrow so I'll wait.  Otherwise I'll decrease significantly.  Also true is it is not a "Rye".  It's a mixed grain bread, soft and moist.  I look forward to another taste in the morning.  

Cheers

Josh

Finnish Rye: (header) 

Spelt SD (with fresh milled whole grain Spelt)

Grain de Orge Take 1

Grain de Orge Take 2

Cheers

Josh

Comments

CPariz1975's picture
CPariz1975

MMMMMMMMMMMMM NICE

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I love the color that spelt gives to the crumb and yours looks fantastic.  Which photos are the Grain de Lin by Steve Scott of Babette's Artisan Bread?  I can see where the first batch of the Grain de Orge was a little squat but the 2nd one was better.  Love these bold bakes.  Well done an happy baking  Josh.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I love the color that spelt gives to the crumb and yours looks fantastic.  Which photos are the Grain de Lin by Steve Scott of Babette's Artisan Bread?  I can see where the first batch of the Grain de Orge was a little squat but the 2nd one was better.  Love these bold bakes.  Well done an happy baking  Josh.

golgi70's picture
golgi70

but i saw it in my email.  I never did the "Grain de Lin' due to lack of flax (or enough flax) on hand.  I just tinkered the flours to be similar and made a pearled barley soaker in lieu of flax.  A huge change I know and the barley doesn't soak up as much h20 as flax does.  But the barley has a nice pop similar to adding sprouted rye berries to a dough which i very much enjoy.  I also attribute some of the sweetness to the barley.  

In all honesty I prefer my flax in granola where it retains its bite and doesn't "gel" so much.  With the exception of mult-grain soakers where it generally adds good texture/flavor. But that's not why i switched it.  i switched it to avoid a trip to the store and used some pearled barley I've been wanting to utilize in a loaf.  Win Win for me.  

Cheers

Josh  

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I would go for any of those breads!

Karin

Syd's picture
Syd

I love that scoring on the boule Josh.  And those crust colours are to die for.  No doubt, lots of flavour there.  

Great baking,

Syd

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Thanks Syd

 

Josh

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Well done Josh! Everything looks spectacular. the pain de orge is very inviting.

Khalid

bethesdabakers's picture
bethesdabakers

I tried out the Grain de Lin formula at our annual Bethesdabakin' event a couple of weeks ago more for humour than results - and so it came to pass - http://thepartisanbaker.com/2014/06/12/swampy/

You might not understand all the references but you can see that humour had the upper hand ...

 

Mick

golgi70's picture
golgi70

You say 110% hydration and my formula reads 102% (unless your including the soaker h20).  Granted I switched the soaker grain hence the Grain de Orge (barley).  So it was different but I imagine of a similar consistency  The dough is certainly wet.  

When you did your folds did you follow suit and do four folds each pass?  this really brought strength to my dough quickly.  At first its porridge like but it quickly gains body.  I think the proper temp (78-80F) is also necessary as the very small amount of preferment needs to be at optimal temp so fermentation also aids in strengthening your dough. I suppose a vigorous culture is necessary too.  A fridge culture might need a day or two of freshening to raise this type of loaf.  

Then comes the shaping (the real challenge).  A nice tight preshape followed by structural shaping (Tartine styleish) using folds as was written in the formula is the key.  I did two loaves on my second go.  One using the structural shaping (follds) and one my usual technique and by far the structural was better.   It's nowhere near as wet but if you Youtube Tartine shaping it'll give you a good idea of the techniques I'm talking about.  

Try it again.  It is so so good.  And if you can handle this dough you can handle any dough.  

Josh

 

bethesdabakers's picture
bethesdabakers

Hi Josh

I'm sure I'm missing something but the total formula reads 109.57% (rounded up to 110..0% in the final dough) + 26.8% starter water.

My first attempt was more light entertainment than anything - too many factors were out of my control. But I was a good boy and folded conscientiously and strangely I found the shaping the easiest part.

Yes, I fully intend to have another bash.

Mick

golgi70's picture
golgi70

I just peeked back at the formula and you are right. I rewrote the formula in my spread sheet and copied down the 102 from the weight right next to the 109% hydration written next to it.  Well so you know albeit I changed the grain (and I have a feeling the flax adds stability to the dough with its gelling properties) my rendition is actually 7 % lower in hydration.  Plus the barley doesn't absorb nearly as much h20 as flax does.  

What flour(s) did you use?  Did you have the T65 to match the formula?  

Josh

isand66's picture
isand66

Nice bakes Josh.  So for the freshly milled Spelt, did you sift it?  I bought a #50 sieve and I'm finding it is too fine and leaving too much bran.  Not sure if I need to mill finer maybe or get a number 40 and do 2 sifts.

What is your experience with this?

Thanks,
Ian

golgi70's picture
golgi70

For two reasons I chose to not sift.  First the original formula that I made used Giusto's Whole Grain Spelt which was very fine/creamy flour and made for a great loaf.  The reason I sifted the second time was it was fresh milled and no where near as fine and creamy so I thought to remove the coarser bits (I think it was about 88% extraction I got).  this time I milled fresh in my Nutrimill and I thought I'd try to replicate the first go and get a nice creamy flour.  The mill is still a new gadget and I find adjusting the grind "tricky".  I never follow the instructions to start with it fully open unless I'm going for a coarse gind.  And so far I've found doing a second pass of the total flour not overwhelmingly effective.  Next I'll try a coarse grind (which the NM doesn't really do well) and then sift and do the second pass with just the sifted portion and see how that goes.  

The other reason I chose to not sift was to see if it was really worth sifting off.  The resulting loaf was excellent.  A bit more sour (but I also held 78F on the dough firmly through bulk) so it was probably not entirely due to the whole grain but temp control as well.  

I am still just sifting with my handy kitchen sifter and I catch what I can.  If the grind is coarse enough my sift is pulling an 85% extraction (but thats from stone ground flour I have from a couple months ago)  I've just gotten though the bulk of my pre ground stone milled flour so I'm sure I'll be doing more experimenting here soon and let you in on any tricks I find.  I have a suspicion that you'll want a different mill if you really want to get good extraction flours.  The range of the NM is quite small and so far I'm just trying to not grind too fine which it is quite good at.  Set to slow feed and high motor it's producing close to a 00 type flour which I think leads to too much starch damage but I'm not certain that is true.  

So the sifts work in which direction?  The higher the number the finer the sift?  

Sorry I always write too much.  

Josh

isand66's picture
isand66

No problem with the lengthy answer.  The lower the number, the bigger the holes.  I tried sifting the whole wheat I milled today and I even went 2 passes back in the mill and I still have a bowl full of course wheat.  I'm thinking if I use a #40 or #30 first and then remill it might work better.  You are probably right about the mill not being ideal for this.  I have been getting fine results with no sifting but it's nice to be able to get a finer flour.                       

golgi70's picture
golgi70

ill play with some grinding-sifting tommorrow and take notes and pics. 

Josh