The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Onions for sourdough

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Bob Marley's picture
Bob Marley

Onions for sourdough

How fine should onions be chopped and how long should they be precooked.  Would be be alright to carmelize them (slow cooked for 2-4 hours slightly covered with some salt and dry vermouth)?

PetraR's picture
PetraR

I use dried onions, I buy them in my local Supermarket.

I have not yet tried using freshly cooked onions because of the moisture.

I am hoping someone can give an Answer as I would love to learn how to go about it too:)

PetraR's picture
PetraR

Thank you Mini Oven, you are a STAR.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/35845/adding-onions-recipe

more in search under:  onions    :)

isand66's picture
isand66

I have not read the links Mini shared with you, but I can tell you from personal experience as I use onions all the time in my breads.  I have used caramelized onions which I cook over low heat with some olive oil for around 20-30 minutes and I have used dried onions and sauteed onions.  The cooked onions will add a little extra moisture to the dough so you may need to compensate slightly.  I usually add the onions during the last minute of mixing the dough with my mixer and make sure they are incorporated evenly.

Bob Marley's picture
Bob Marley

I can carmelize a whole bag of onions into one single cup.  Just cook them in some peanut oil, salt and dry vermouth and keep the lid slightly ajar, around an eighth of an inch and keep the heat below medium.  Occasionally flip the onions over using a flip of the wrist (think Pow Wok).  Two to four hours later they're carmelized.  But you gotta' allow the moisture to escape a bit slowly during the process.  And keep the heat below medium.

This is the same procedure that I use for carmelizing my onions used in my quiche.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

can you use a crock pot?  with the lid off...?

Bob Marley's picture
Bob Marley

Whatever works for you, Mini.  I'm old school with my metals and all.  Just keep the lid slightly adjar to promote browning.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

works for me.  first cut into rings and sprinkle with salt, let drain, pat dry and air dry (or use a dryer)  When dry jar as rings or break up.  Before using hydrate with vermouth, drain and caramelise or toss into the recipe flour.

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There is a lot of moisture in fresh cut onions that has to be reduced before browning can begin.  With a large batch, I cover (add a little oil or butter)  in a fry pan until all are glassy (cooked) and water has pretty much separated. (This part can also be done in a microwave oven and transferred to fry pan.)  Turn on the exhaust fan. Remove the lid and the water leaves quickly, browning begins so stick around to stir.  

When doing several things at once this has proved the best way to get the job done evenly without burning the onions too early in the procedure.  Even on high, the liquid will boil and prevent scorching.  As soon as the water is gone, so is the protection and temperature in the pan rises getting hot fast to brown the onions.

Mini

golgi70's picture
golgi70

I made a great loaf like this. No vermouth but caramelized for bout 2 hours. At the very end we added a touch of fine minced garlic. Then we cooled completely overnight In fridge. Pop out a couple hours to bring back to room temp. We added toasted pecans for the SS Pecunion. So delish. Just remember even cooked down like this they still add quite a bit of hydration to the dough.  For this reason I added at the start of the mix so I could correct hydration if needed. 

Josh

Bob Marley's picture
Bob Marley

And at the finish of carmelization, my onions are somewhat browned and have that good dry aroma that only vermouth can bring out.