The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Is the writing on the wall for the future of commercial mixers for home use?

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risenshine's picture
risenshine

Is the writing on the wall for the future of commercial mixers for home use?

I got to look at one of the new Hobart Legacy 20 quart mixers. I think the older "classic" series will become very sought after by home and semi-professional bakers. since they are "old technology".  It's sort of like the older cars that did not have the computers, the complex electrical systems, and most technically advanced new materials like plastics, and carbon fiber  etc. The Classics are made of Cast Iron, Machined steel castings, and hardened steel gears and shafts.. and are relatively simple mechanical systems.. Three speed.. not an electronically controlled , variable speed, circuit-board controlled this or that...

 

Modern materials and technology are nice but they can require more technical knowledge and skill to maintain. They have nice features, but I think for the home  or small business bakers, the classics will be the only ones that can be maintained and repaired "at home" at a reasonable price. There will be a time when parts are not available through Hobart, but there will be used parts as we see now and aftermarket companies will meet demands.

Does anybody else get this sense too?

 

Long Live the Classics!!

mixinator's picture
mixinator

Does anybody else get this sense too?

With a 20-quart capacity and at $5,000US I don't see it taking off with home bakers.

risenshine's picture
risenshine

I may have worded my thoughts poorly.. it was more a lament to the passing of an era of quality

I was thinking we are seeing the end of an era in the passing of the "classic" series of mixers. As they get older, and fall out of repair, or their price becomes unaffordable to the small business or "home businesses" we will not have the fortune of owning commercial mixers of this quality. As of now, you can still find "deals" that are not much more than the top end of the consumer grade mixers.

 It's the continual march towards low quality, high turn-over items instead of building something of quality and durability. I think Hobart changed the design, not to offer a better mixer, but to offer a mixer they can build in a price range professionals can afford. The labor intensive machining on the old Classics is impressive and probably would cost more than the new model to produce today.  The new 20 QT RUNS 5 - 6 thousand as it is.

 

 

pambakesbread's picture
pambakesbread

Hi I can double down on that. I recently purchased a Hobart 12qt and I love it. It has the strength to do anything. It is quiet -quieter than my new Kitchen Aid which sounds something like a grass mower put in the dryer. I found mine on Ebay (where else) and it turned out to be a great purchase. Look around I spent months on the site trying to get one that did not look as if it had fought in WW1. These were built to last and last.

The engineering is great and they have stood the test of time. I like the simple manual knobs and timer. I can't use my cell phone that #@4%%! is smarter than I am so hands on technology is very welcomed. Hobe-wan and I do a lot of work and he just sings. Can a person fall for a machine? Hey a lot of Guys like sports cars so why not. I just purchased a Grill Dome because after 3 years of playing with the idea of a Tuscan Oven (which I wanted desperately) the new regulations of the City I live in made it economically impossible. I am hoping that the Grill Dome will be a good alternative. I bought a Red one, of course, and am soliciting names for him. Pam