The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Greetings from Oregon

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steppinheavnward's picture
steppinheavnward

Greetings from Oregon

I just wanted to drop in and say hello. I can't make bread. Period. It either never rises or always falls. However, I am not giving up. I will learn to bake bread! Ha!

 I'm looking forward to learning something new and exciting here on this site!

 ~AnnMarie

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Welcome to the site!

Since you are in the Northwest too, I should mention that a few of us are talking about getting together for a picnic or something in mid-September. I thought the 13th, but I'm not seeing it in that thread. If you feel like spending part of a day with a bunch of bread nerds, you are welcome to join us. More details to follow.

jvr's picture
jvr

I live in Tigard and am a young self-taught baker (26) and would love to learn some tricks from others. My grandparents used to make everything themselves but passed before I had a chance to learn from them. I'd be happy to share my starters and anything I can make...

rcornwall's picture
rcornwall

Welcome AnnMarie. What part of Oregon to you come from? I live in Toledo. You should post some of your recipes for us to look at. Maybe we can help. Remember bread is science and folowing some basic rules will ensure success.

rcornwall

edh's picture
edh

Welcome AnnMarie,

You're in the right place; the wonderful folks on this site have gotten me out of more bread-making jams than I can count! No question too trivial; someone always has a good idea.

Keep at it!

edh

Rosalie's picture
Rosalie

Yes, welcome, AnnMarie. 

rcornwall calls bread science.  It's also art.  The rules include getting the feel for your dough.

If it doesn't rise, maybe your water is too hot and you've killed the yeast (assuming the yeast was good to begin with).  If it falls, maybe you've let it rise too long.

From this site you'll learn a lot.  Good luck.

Rosalie

Plannerjohn's picture
Plannerjohn

I live in Portland and would love to meet other bakers in the area!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Neat. We'll post an exact location, date, and time soon. I think it'll definitely involve hitting Bob's Red Mill for some grain shopping, and then probably a picnic is Sellwood or Westmoreland Park. Stay tuned!

RUCHIR's picture
RUCHIR

Hi there! Iam from Pune in India &I've found out this great site just recently.I am terrible at bread.But of course I'll learn!I am passionate 'bout cooking,& my favourites include traditional recipes. -Ruchir

rcornwall's picture
rcornwall

Welcome Ruchir. I would love to hear about any unique Indian breads you make.

rcornwall

RUCHIR's picture
RUCHIR

Actually only the people in the North, especially from Punjab used the oven to make stuff like naan and Roti.But those are the very common recipes.I live in the south-west, where we usually dont bake anything traditional barring a handful of recipes.They used to bake these things between two heated tawas (griddle).The following recipe is not known to most people.It is a type of 'wadi'.(all wadis are made by heating the ingredients till they start to for a ball in the vessel,and once this happens,the mix is transferred onto a tray and are patted with the had immediately.After cooling, they are cut into squares.Wadis are mostly sweet)This one involves just mixing and baking. So dont worry about the patting immediately part! After the long introduction,here's the recipe 4 u: Two cups slightly coarse whole wheat flour(or 1.5 cups plain flour and .5 cup of semolina) Three-fourths of a cup of pure cow-milk ghee Quarter of a cup of castor sugar A pinch and a half of soda bicarb 10 to 12 pods of cardamom A pinch of powdered nutmeg Remove the seeds from the pods of cardamom.Grind to a powder.Beat the ghee well for a long time.Add sugar and beat well again till sugar dissolves completely.Then add either the wheat flour or the other combination,the cardamom powder,nutmeg powder & the soda.Knead well.Let sit covered for 4 hrs.Then grease a shallow tray(maybe 1 inch deep)with ghee.Put the mix onto the tray and pat till about quarter an inch thick.Bak on low to medium heat.These wadis get baked soon,so take care while baking.Then cut into cubes.Freshly baked'sakharparyachya wadya'ready! *prefarably use the wholegrain wheat flour.Do not throw the cardamom peels.Add them to the water while brewing tea, and add hot milk to the tea.Then remove the peels.

browndog's picture
browndog

Ruchir, that sounds so interesting! If you are ever inclined to post pictures of this process i'm sure you would please quite a few of us here.

Cooky's picture
Cooky

Hey, AnnMarie. You will be amazed at how much you'll learn here. You can hardly find a better beginner project than Floyd's Daily Bread (click on the lessons link on top) to get you started. It took me several tries before my loaves started to look anywhere near as beauteous as Floyd's, but even the 'failures' were yummy enough to keep me trying. 

 

"I am not a cook. But I am sorta cooky."

rcornwall's picture
rcornwall

Very cool RUCHIR I can't wait to try it

rcornwall