The Fresh Loaf

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update on rye sprouts

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yozzause's picture
yozzause

update on rye sprouts

Hi  just an update  on a point raised by Varda and Janet to the sprouting of the malted rye grains that i obtained from a local (AUS) brew shop.

 

The Rye berries pictured have sprouted after 24 hours and exposed to the air for a further 12 hours. These were sold as Malted Rye but obiously  these are still viable, most likely just rolled through malt powder rather than the berries themselves having been processed for any malt content. Most malt is commercially from Barley grain where the berries are sprouted  and processed for the malt.

In my circumstance the malt was washed off in the soaking process, in brewing it would have become part of the wort. the water could have been saved and used or there maybe unmalted rye available at the brew shops. A point to remember is not to soak for to long as the grain can drown  agood soak and the exposure to air does the trick and perhaps a few quick dunks to stop drying out to fast.

As an Aviculturalist ( bird keeper ) we  had a problem at one time with seed coming in from Queensland  that  when soaked failed to sprout so wasnt viable, checks were made with the Agricultural department and we found that the seed had failed a sample test for weed seeds and was then irradiated which kills the  viability of all the seeds in the bag the alternative was for the company to return the seed to its origin. obviosly the cheaper alternative  was denaturing the grain, which is probably fine as long as you dont want to sprout it. 

Kind regards Derek  

Comments

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Hi, Derek

Ok those Rye berries are viable for sprouting. In Dubai, i could never find rye berries save for an organic specialty health store. Unfortunately, i cannot get them to sprout; i've tried many times. I guess they were irradiated. I'd love to sprout rye and try them in your recipe.

wishing you all the best.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the only grain you can get is the irradiated kind.  Islam forbids anyone making beer or alcohol,  Importing viable seeds will be problamatic.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Well, you can make liquor out of many things besides grains, so i don't think that grains would be irradiated for that particular reason. Moreover, i've sprouted turkish improrted wheat with no problems, in addition to the naked barley from the same store from which i bought the rye. Mysterious.

Khalid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

When I lived in Saudi the two biggest sellers at the largest Safeway Grocery store in the world in Jeddah were sugar and grape juice!

Mebake's picture
Mebake

I remember that i succeeded once in initializing the sprouting process ,but something happened and they were spoiled. I guess sprouting rye can be tricky. 

Khalid

yozzause's picture
yozzause

Hi Khalid it seems that international trade or as here even interstate trade  can dictate  treatments for different foods  and ingrediants. With the bird seeds it was because the sample contained or was contaminated with a small number of weed seeds that the consignment was required to undergo Iradiation and that was just for animal feed.

I remember that when we visited a flour mill during my apprenticeship there is all sorts of rubbish that comes in with consignments of wheat from farmers , sticks, stones, bottles ,cans and assortments of wildlife.

Sprouting does create the ideal climate for moulds and undesirable growths to establish so cleanliness is required all through the process.

regards Derek   

   

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks for the info, Derek :) 

Yes, that makes perfect sense.

Khalid

 

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Derek,

After reading your experiment results I tried the same with my grain.  It did not sprout which is what I expected since the store I purchase my malted grains (rye, barley and wheat) from lists all their products based on the 'linder' # which confuses me still but has to do with temperature that controls the enzymes that control the nuances in flavor derived from each bucket of malted grain they sell.

Another fun bread adventure.

Thanks for the prompt!

Janet