The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Temperature in House For Rising

catowner's picture
catowner

Temperature in House For Rising

It seems like all the bread books say a long slow rise produces the best bread.  But what temperature creates that?  My house is in the mid-70s during the hot months and low 60s other times.  Is the 70s too warm?  Is the 60s too cold?  What should the house temp be to get the best rise but not have it rise too fast?

ChefRon's picture
ChefRon

Catowner,

 

We knead the dough, let it rest, then retard it by placing it in the refrigerator overnight. It will rise under refrigeration, but very slowly. This is what allows the dough to develop flavor. The next day, we let it warm to room temp and complete the full rise. We then scale, shape and retard overnight yet again. This is the idea your sources are referring to. Retarding is not necessary but does provide a superor product.

-Ron 

catowner's picture
catowner

Ron,

Thanks for the info.  I do sometimes do the rise in the refrigerator with certain things I make.  But what if I want to leave the dough out for the whole cycle?  I have noticed that if it is warmer in the house it rises faster (I know that is obvious) but what I want to know is what is the best range for house temperature if I am going to do all the risings out of the fridge?  Thanks.

Catowner

browndog's picture
browndog

If you can keep your dough somewhere between 70 and 80 degrees, that is pretty much ideal, depending on what you're baking. Cooler is fine but slows the process and creates more acid flavor, while too warm over-stimulates the yeast and compromises the end product. In fact your summer house temps sound ideal, and in the winter if you want to keep it warmer just pop it in the oven with the light on.

catowner's picture
catowner

Browndog,

Thanks!  Maybe that is why I have problems in the winter.  I have always avoided making bread in the summer as I thought the house was too warm but when I make it in the winter it never seems to rise.  So I will try some bread this summer.