The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

doughs for rising bowl

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Jim Burgin's picture
Jim Burgin

doughs for rising bowl

How do i know which dough recipes will do well in a rising bowl?  Do some formulas not do well in them?

Ford's picture
Ford

I am not sure what you mean by "rising bowl."  Do you mean a bowl in which the dough is bulk fermented or proofed?  Elaborate, please.

Ford

Jim Burgin's picture
Jim Burgin

I mean proofed.  Thanks.

PetraR's picture
PetraR

I am with Ford, please do tell us a bit more.

adri's picture
adri

Do you mean: Which doughs can be proofed in a banneton/basked and then baked directly on a stone/baking-sheet and which are baked in a pan?

Jim Burgin's picture
Jim Burgin

Sort of.   I mean are there doughs that should not be put in a banneton/basket at all.  Thanks for writing.

PetraR's picture
PetraR

I proove most of my doughs in Bannetons but use a loaf Pan for my Sandwich loafs, this shape is easier to use for the Toaster , that is the only reason for it.

 

adri's picture
adri

Yes, almost all doughs that can be prooved in Bannetons can be used with loaf pans. Usually, pan loafs are put in the oven after a longer prooving time. You usually don't want that much oven spring with them but have the rise before the oven as they just can expand properly in one direction. This is why I wrote almost: Some (especially for a beginner) rare circumstances  like malt that is active at the prooving temperature must be altered too.

There are however a lot of doughs, that cannot be addopted from loaf pan to banneton. Those are the breads where usually more than one factors come together that make the dough unstable: High hydration; seeds, (coarsly ground) berries, wheat types like Einkorn, non wheat type flour, shaky hands,....

 

Adrian

PetraR's picture
PetraR

I was not aware of this.

Thank you so much for you input:)

So far I had never  had a problem using high hydration doughs in my Bannetons, they work perfect.

 

adri's picture
adri

"high" still is relative.

In winter I sometimes bake a bread with 100% hydration. It has just wheat in form of spelt berries, and just  34% of the cereals are (rye) flour - the rest are berries, some coarsly ground. For this kind of bread, everything below 90% wold be middle to low hydration.

For wheat breads, I'd consider everything above 75% as high.

PetraR's picture
PetraR

Oh I do understand, yes, I can see now that there is a difference.

I am glad you brought that up.

Thank you so much.

I do not go higher than 75% Hydration for my wheat breads, that is just about wet enough for me to still be able to handle.

Do you have any recipes for your 100% hydration Bread?

adri's picture
adri

Notes in german. I might translate and write it in full some time.

PetraR's picture
PetraR

I am German:)  FREU

adri's picture
adri

I wrote you a private message then :)

PetraR's picture
PetraR

Got it:)

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

Every pot has a lid, every question an answer, and every country represented.

cerevisiae's picture
cerevisiae

Yeah, that was pretty cute to watch. I am pleased by things working out well like that.

PetraR's picture
PetraR

It worked out great didn't it:)

PetraR's picture
PetraR

That is so true David Esq:)

I love this Site too.