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San Francisco Style Sourdough with Increase Whole Wheat

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isand66's picture
isand66

San Francisco Style Sourdough with Increase Whole Wheat

This recipe is from fellow TFL regular David Snyder.  As many of you know his quest for the perfect SF style Sourdough has benefited us all and this latest version has an increased hydration level.  The original post is here.  I followed his directions and ingredients closely with the exception of the rye flour.  I used my own freshly ground  whole rye flour and increased the amount in the main dough to 11  grams and used 11 grams less of the whole wheat flour.

I wanted to use my new basket I just bought at Home Goods for this bake. While it seemed like a good idea at the time, apparently since this dough is so wet even though I thoroughly floured it using rice flour and AP flour the risen dough still stuck to the inside of the basket.  Nothing like that sickening feeling when your dough does not release from your basket :(.

BasketRisen

Even though the look of this bake is pretty ugly, the crumb came out nice and open and moist.  The bread ended up with a low profile due to the aforementioned sticking issue and I think it may have also been a little over-proofed.  I usually proof my final dough after it comes out of the refrigerator at 82 degrees but this recipe calls for a final proof at 86 degrees of the shaped loaf.  I'm going to try using a bulk retard of this dough and then shape and see if the flavor profile is the same.

Crumbgroup

Closeupcrumb

As with all of Dave's formulas, this one is excellent and opens up plenty of possibilities to experiment with different ingredients.

Happy Baking.

Ian

 

Comments

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The crumb looks good, although the biggest holes do suggest over-proofing. 

The warm proofing I use increases acetic acid production, I think.

Thanks for trying this. Looking forward to your explorations.

David

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks David

i agree that it was over-proofed.  I wasn't paying enough attention like I should have.  In any case it sure tastes good.

Regards

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I forget that with a new basket you have to rice flour the basket and the dough that touches it - for the first time or two.  I think that it might have been a little over proofed but at least it didn't collapse - even after it stuck so it couldn't have been much over proofed!  It has to taste great since Lucy says this is a fine tasting bread!   Nice recovery and

Happy Baking.

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks DA...I said the same thing to myself after it stuck.  I usually flour the wet doughs before putting them in a basket like this and I forgot to do it.  I'm working on another version today using a bulk retard in the refrigerator instead of the shaped loaf.  I will be curious to see if it comes out any different.

Regards,
Ian

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

bread! Looks like it has a nice rich wheaty taste too. That sickening feeling when the dough sticks is only matched by turning it out of the pan and seeing nothing nothing nothing move. I've done that twice and almost always now put a circle of parchment paper in the pan. Beautiful basket, love the color too.

Finally found some Kamut and made a whole grain loaf this week. I think I need to ease into heavier bread by using a little more AP because it seemed to be a little strong tasting and the crumb was on the dense side. I guess that could be because of being used to the more open and chewy type texture of Tartine types. Still, it is time to add some variety and the taste was well received by my favorite food tester. Will add some rye next time and he will be even happier!

Barbra

isand66's picture
isand66

Thank you for your kind words Barbara.  We've all had the sticking problem at one point or another.  Every once in a while I decide to risk it and use flour on my peel instead of using parchment paper....most of the time I regret it :).

Glad you are experimenting with the Kamut.  I suggest you use it at maybe 20% to start to AP or bread flour and slowly work your way up.  It benefits from a bulk fermentation overnight as well.

Look forward to hearing how your next bake goes.


Regards,
ian