The Fresh Loaf

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Brioche Question

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pochman's picture
pochman

Brioche Question

I recently starting making my Brioche loafs in a Pullman loaf. Problem that keeps occurring is that when done baking the center collapses.  Is this an over proofing issue? Or could this be I am adding in the incorrect of weight for the size of the pan?  Any feedback on this issue is greatly appreciated!!!!

andychrist's picture
andychrist

Have only made Brioche à tête myself (in those little tart tins) but what kind of pan had you been using successfully before you went to the Pullman? Also, what form of Brioche are you doing, nanterre, or just a solid loaf? Not sure, but suspect that if your Brioche had been over-proofed (or over-hydrated) it would not just have collapsed in the center but on top as well. Could simply be that the oven heat is not penetrating deep enough into the Pullman, in which case you might have better success if you lower the oven temperature after the first ten minutes and stretch out the remainder of the bake. That way you will still get good oven spring and proper browning by the time your Brioche is done all the way through.  Am sure though that others here could diagnose the problem better than I.

pochman's picture
pochman

Thank you for your response!  I am just making a solid loaf and in fact have used this exact same recipe for tete as well. Which baked up perfectly. 

I baked the loaf at 350 for about 35 minutes. Perhaps start at a higher temp and lower after 10 minutes as you suggested?

andychrist's picture
andychrist

Dunno, but the all recipes I've found for Brioche say to preheat the oven to 375°. My own problem was that at that temperature, they'd start to burn before the têtes were baked through. So I'd cool down the oven and leave the Brioche in for another ten minutes, allowing them to dry out enough inside without browning the delicate, egg-washed crust too far. Think if I had baked with steam my Brioche would never have burned, but my oven is too small for that kind of setup. Am thinking though, since you had success with your têtes, perhaps if you tried the same recipe in a nanterre you'd get better results in the Pullman than with the solid loaf — greater ratio of surface area to volume. BTW, have you seen Mark Sinclair's Brioche video on YouTube?

http://youtu.be/FuwI5HAqWH8

Hope this helps

andychrist's picture
andychrist

is that dividing the Brioche into the eighths provides vital structure, perhaps not so much additional surface area as first I'd thought. If you follow Mark's method of stretching and folding the dough, and palming those eight sections around until they cohere into balls, your loaf will have a better chance of holding up all the way through — just like your têtes.

Okay, I'm outta here. ;-)

andychrist's picture
andychrist

Well, is my face red.  See Mark says to bake at 350° standard, 325° convection. Guess I'll preheat my own oven to 350° now when baking Brioches!

Also noticed, he had what looked like a shallow pan laying on the bottom of his oven, though it didn't seem he was using it to generate steam, huh.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Or describe it more? Crust color on all four sides?   How soon do you tip the loaf out of the pan after baking?