The Fresh Loaf

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no knead bread question

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jimtr6's picture
jimtr6

no knead bread question

I am trying the no knead bread as directed by the originator (Lacey in Staten Island), it looks like he just left the bread dough overnight (12 hours) uncovered unrefrigerated according to NYTimes video on Youtube, so that's what I did, next morning (this morning it had risen, but had a crust (dried dough shell), is that normal?, also seemed loose so it looks like it will be sort of flat, any help appreciated, I have some starters going, not ready so experimenting with seeing if I can get a decent yeast bread

Breadandwine's picture
Breadandwine

You need to keep it in a food storer with a lid - that's what I do to prevent a crust as you describe:

http://nobreadisanisland.blogspot.co.uk/2010/04/basic-loaf-of-bread.html

Look for method C.

The dough just needs a bit of folding and flattening to tighten it up, shape into your required form, then put to prove. Each time you do this, use the results as a marker and tweak your methods/proportions accordingly. It's a good idea to take notes! :)

jimtr6's picture
jimtr6

thanks, I figured an airtight covering would be the answer, although as I found the 2 parts flour 1 part water seemed loose, the newer recipe is even more water at 10:7 ratio opposed to the 2:1, but it did say to knead ih flour as needed

BGM's picture
BGM

DON'T add more flour.  The dough is supposed to be wet and soft.  If you want it tighter, fold it a few times in the bowl during the 12 -18 hour rise, as suggested in the first comment..  It will gain strength without adding flour.  If you look at the illustrations in Jim Lahey's book, his dough is really soft.

BobBoule's picture
BobBoule

When I make my version of Jim Lahey's No Knead bread, I find it to be a gooey mess, however the bread turns out to be rather delightful. I leave it on the counter for 12 to 18 hours, but covered so it doesn't dry out (and I'm concerned about airborne cooties making a home in my dough).

jimtr6's picture
jimtr6

thanks, I got one to come out and did get those air hole pockets and a bit lighter in density, so I'm heading in the right direction, I slightly burnt the bottom but have a 9" pizza stone coming for the bottom of the dutch oven, the dutch oven is the correct method, right, or are some just using a pan, what temps are best?

Loafer thirteen's picture
Loafer thirteen

I've been using a cast iron dutch oven with a glass lid, and raise the loaf on a greased parchment. When the dutch oven and lid are hot in the preheated oven, I transfer the loaf, paper and all into the hot pan and cover it for 15-20 minutes. Then remove the cover to brown the crust. Good result this way. I won't change this part of the process.

Loafer thirteen's picture
Loafer thirteen

400 degrees F.

jimtr6's picture
jimtr6

thanks loafer thirteen, makes good sense and goes with other bits I've read, what do you think of spritzing with a water spray to create a steamy environment within the pot? Do you think going the full 18 hours over the minimum 12 develops characteristics in the dough, like less density, better rise, better and bigger air holes, maybe a bit of sour taste?

LindyD's picture
LindyD

"I am trying the no knead bread as directed by the originator (Lacey in Staten Island)"

Because he deserves the credit, it is Jim Lahey of Sullivan Street Bakery, NYC, who introduced the concept of no-knead bread to the public.  The New York Times featured an article by Mark Bittman explaining the process, and the rest is history.

Here's a link to Lahey's website which you may find helpful:  http://www.sullivanstreetbakery.com/recipes

 

Christy King's picture
Christy King

If you don't have an airtight container, you can use plastic wrap over the bowl. I set a plate on top of the bowl when I do that to make sure the wrap stays in place.

jimtr6's picture
jimtr6

yes, I have a nice stainless steel bowl and I saw no reason to transfer it from that for the 12 to 18 hour sit time, the plastic wrap doesn't cling that well, I settled on a large heavy plate, it's perfect