The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Anyone know what bread this would be or how to duplicate it?

  • Pin It
MiserDD's picture
MiserDD

Anyone know what bread this would be or how to duplicate it?

Was making Chicken Cordon Bleu for my wife when I came across this picture of a CCB sandwich; just curious if anyone knows how to make a bread like this, the crust almost looks like it had lye sprayed on it.

 

golgi70's picture
golgi70

It looks like some sort of pannini'd baguette to me.  

Josh

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

a long roll opened and flattened in a folding grill.   Vienna white bread with oil in the dough.  Could easily be dipped in lye. The bubbles in the crust look like it went thru retardation.  Browned a second time in a clamp grill.  Could easily be a hot dog bun.

Antilope's picture
Antilope

it looks like the crust on a pretzel roll.

daveazar531's picture
daveazar531

Looks like a hero roll buttered and toasted on a press..

MiserDD's picture
MiserDD

Would anyone know how to make a bread like this bread???  As in, flour, water, etc.

fotomat1's picture
fotomat1

for the starter
2 1/2 cups (320g) unbleached AP flour
1/2 tsp instant yeast
3/4 to 1 cup warm water

for the dough
2 1/2 cups (320g) unbleached AP flour
1 2/3 tsp salt
1 Tbs. sugar
1 tsp instant yeast
1 Tbs. olive oil
3/4 to 1 cup warm water
cornmeal or semolina for dusting

1. The night before baking, stir together the flour and the yeast, then slowly add the 3/4 cup of water. Mixing by hand bring it together to form a rough dough. If needed, add up to 1 cup water total.
2. Remove the dough to a lightly-floured surface and knead for a few minutes until it becomes smooth. Place the dough in a lightly-oiled bowl, turn to coat, then cover to ferment.
3. After about 3 hours, you can place the biga in the refrigerator overnight.
the next day...
4. Be sure to remove the biga to the counter at least an hour before proceeding so it comes to room temperature.

5. Mix the flour, salt, sugar and yeast thoroughly in a large bowl.
6. Cut the biga into smallish lumps and add it in, then, finally, the remaining water. Continue to mix until a soft dough forms. You may have to slightly adjust the flour and/or water. The resulting dough should be soft and just barely sticky. It is not a batter or stiff (like bagel dough for instance).
7. Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl to rise until doubled in volume, about 2 hours.
8. Remove the dough to a lightly-floured surface. Cut it in 2 being careful not to deflate it too much. If you are making loaves, shape each half into a 'log' shape, then after a short wait into a 'batard', i.e., slightly tapered at each end. If you are making rolls, cut each half into 4 equal pieces. Then after a short wait, shape each piece into a 'torpedo', or a round.
9. Place the shaped dough on a parchment covered baking sheet sprinkled with cornmeal. Spray lightly with oil, then cover lightly with plastic to rise until almost doubled, about 1 hour. Slash the rolls down the middle just before baking. The loaves should be slashed in a decorative pattern too.

10. Bake in a preheated oven (450 F / 220 C), with steam for 30 minutes (loaf) or about 17 minutes (rolls).
11. Cool on a rack/ Slice in half /butter tops/Insert chicken/grill in grill pan or panni press.

MiserDD's picture
MiserDD

What will cause all the small bubbles on the exterior of the crust or give it that dipped in lye appearance?

Antilope's picture
Antilope

seems to be this blog. They just mention, "favorite Artisan bread". 

http://tellystastytidbits.wordpress.com/2010/06/30/chicken-cordon-bleu-panini/

MiserDD's picture
MiserDD

That's where I got the pic from.... wish they detailed the bread, "Artisan" is a huge category.

fotomat1's picture
fotomat1

fermentation should give you the blisters and the grill the color.

Antilope's picture
Antilope

panini, French bread panini, pretzel panini. Which category resembles the crust on the image above? None are exact, but the pretzel panini seems to be the closest. I get that color on bread when I add a lot (1%) of diastatic malt powder.

MacawGuy's picture
MacawGuy

Looks similar to some pain l'ancienne we made from the BBA.