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Light fluffy with thin crust.

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eddieb's picture
eddieb

Light fluffy with thin crust.

Hi, I decided to contribute this recipe through an answer given by one of the forum members to a question I had asked. Because I have a digestive problem i.e I cannot eat most breads other than really soft, fluffy and usually have to remove the crust. This recipe was found on another forum ( not a bread forum ) by my Wife and has proved to be perfect for me. The only alteration to the original is I have done away with the Sugar content.( and the rise time ).

This recipe is to say the least sticky and therefore I recommend mixing in a Bread maker.

NB: All measurements are in mills, using Electric Scales.

Water 285 mills ( cold or hot, it makes little or no difference difference ).

Bread Flour 400 mills

Butter    melt one (1)  Tablespoon .

Sugar  one (1) Tablespoon.. ( I don't use this ).

Salt   ten (10) mills.

Yeast  one packet (dry) 7 mills.

Milk Powder  two (2) Tablespoons.

----------------------------------------------------------

Breadmaker.. round  Cake tin 230 mm diam and 36mm lip. Greaseproof paper. Baking tray.

 

My Breadmaker uses the Liquid first method.

Add contents to Breadmaker and use the Dough cycle.

After the Dough cycle has finished turn out onto heavily floured surface.With Flour on hands knock back and fold several times.

Then fold into a ball, place into Greaseproof papered  cake tin . ( doesn't matter where because the dough will fill the tin during the rise.

Place in draught free area. ( I use my Mini oven). After four to five ( 4 to 5 ) hours dough will have quadrupled in size.

Place baking tray in the bottom of oven and preheat  to 220deg Celsius ( the heated tray ensures that the bottom gets cooked ). Place dish with the Dough in it in oven onto heated tray. Bake for 20 minutes.

The finished product will be Golden Brown with a soft inner and a crust no thicker than 1mm.

I also flour it with Rice Flour and move the bread up to the top of the oven for the last five minutes.

 

 

 

 

adri's picture
adri

Is your "mills" a unit for weight or for volume?

eddieb's picture
eddieb

As stated, I use electrical ( digital ) scales, therefore I measure in weight.

adri's picture
adri

Is it save to assume that one "mill" is about one gram?(dry yeast packages here have about 7g - yours has 7mills.)

Without this I cannot estimate how much fat and milk powder you use, as they are still measured in volume.

At first I thought it would be a funny abbreviation for ml ;) (unit for volume) which made perfectly sense to me for water.

2.5% salt is a lot. Usually sandwich loafs have less (1.8%). I also prefer at least 2% of salt. Is this the reason why you don't eat sandwich bread?

You just cannot eat the crust or are there some other problems with bread. Maybe we can point you to other recipes that fit your needs for that you can vary a bit.

eddieb's picture
eddieb

 

Is it safe to assume that one "mill" is about one gram?(dry yeast packages here have about 7g - yours has 7mills.) yes

Without this I cannot estimate how much fat and milk powder you use, as they are still measured in volume.

Where do I mention Fat?

Plastic spoon Orange in colour with 1 Tbs printed on it.

At first I thought it would be a funny abbreviation for ml ;) (unit for volume) which made perfectly sense to me for water. My mistake, should read Ml.

2.5% salt is a lot. Usually sandwich loafs have less (1.8%). I also prefer at least 2% of salt. Is this the reason why you don't eat sandwich bread? Your idea of what is too much Salt is yours, not every bodies.

You just cannot eat the crust or are there some other problems with bread. Maybe we can point you to other recipes that fit your needs for that you can vary a bit. If you read again you will see I suffer from a Digestive prob, therefore chewy thick bread is impossible for me to eat/digest. I don't need you to recommend any other recipe because I have one, the above recipe. But, thank you all the same.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

that this is a milk setting?  hear me out...

My digital scales has a mode button and I can change grams settings between:  grams, milk grams or water ml.  

Is it possible it is in a milk setting and it looks like mills?  If the letters are close enough, and hard to read (or misprint) this could be why some of us are puzzled with the measurements including myself.  

lizzy0523's picture
lizzy0523

I have never seen the "milk gram" unit before. I was thinking that it was probably just an alternative abbreviation for ml? Either way, probably not a good unit to measuring anything but the specific liquid on which it is based. I am now very curious though.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

      Sorry, see even I get confused.  

If I put 200g water on the grams setting, it weighs the same in water ml. but if I set it to milk, I have to add more milk volume to come out with the same ml as the water in ml.  

The only thing I can think of using it for is if I want to substitute  milk to water or water to milk.  

I've sat and played with it but it only leads to head scratching.  

 

I do have to be careful not to have it in the milk setting.  

I weigh and list all my ingredients preferably in g.

eddieb's picture
eddieb

No.

eddieb's picture
eddieb

Mini Oven's pictureMini OvenMar 27 2014 - 6:28am

 

that this is a milk setting?  hear me out...

My digital scales has a mode button and I can change grams settings between:  grams, milk grams or water ml.  

Is it possible it is in a milk setting and it looks like mills?  If the letters are close enough, and hard to read (or misprint) this could be why some of us are puzzled with the measurements including myself.  

No.

Big Spoon's picture
Big Spoon

Ok, I'm assuming here but I think his "mils" are 1/1000 of a pound. The first scale I bought measured in 1/1000 of a pound. I had to convert from "mils" to grams. The water calulation would be ((mils/1000)*454) or 285 mils = .285 * 454g = 129.4g. The flour calulation would be 400 mils = .400* 454g = 181.6g. For a water/flour hydration of 71%. Rest of calculations are left up to the student as an exercise.

It was a lot of fun. I used that scale for two years before I got a proper gram based scale.

eddieb's picture
eddieb

Wow.

Big Spoon's picture
Big Spoon

Do a "common sense" test to help determine how the scale is calibrated. (That is a type of test; i.e. a simple test with obvious answers)

weigh a pound package of pasta (preferably cellophane wrapped to keep the packaging factor low)
if just over 1000 then probably is thousands of a pound (mils for this discussion).
if just over 454 then probably is grams (ml = mililiters (a wet measurement) should be almost the same.
if just over 16 then probably is ounces.

My pound "cardboard box" of pasta weighs 17 1/4 oz. and is labeled as 1 pound net weight (454 grams).

possum-liz's picture
possum-liz

The only 'mil' measurement I've run across means 1/1000 of an inch. As others have said 1 ml of water  'weighs' 1 gram (under standard conditions). What one ml of anything else weighs depends on its density. I think the usual volume conversion for a 7 g pkt of instant yeast is about 2 1/4 tsp.

I'm so happy to live in a country that changed over to using metric.

Big Spoon's picture
Big Spoon

Yes, mil as in thickness of plastic bags. But in reviewing his original post, I see he was using "mills" which sent me off in another direction. And speaking of common sense tests, I completely ignored the packet of yeast weight as 7 mills. Same as gram weight of yeast packets. I was just too tired (lazy) to get up and go into the kitchen to check. That, hopefully, would have led me down the correct path.

And I guess Mini Oven's Milk setting takes into account milk's density.

eddieb's picture
eddieb

My apologies to all. I will now change the recipe with the correct measurements. I have also been trying to upload a couple of shots but as yet cannot figure out the way this forum upload works.

Hi, I decided to contribute this recipe through an answer given by one of the forum members to a question I had asked. Because I have a digestive problem i.e I cannot eat most breads other than really soft, fluffy and usually have to remove the crust. This recipe was found on another forum ( not a bread forum ) by my Wife and has proved to be perfect for me. The only alteration to the original is I have done away with the Sugar content.( and the rise time ).

This recipe is to say the least sticky and therefore I recommend mixing in a Bread maker.

NB: All measurements are in ml, using Electric Scales.

Water 285 ml ( cold or hot, it makes little or no difference difference ). Place jug on scales and fill to 285 Ml

Bread Flour 400 ml

Butter    melt one (1)  Tablespoon .Orange plastic with 1 Tbs printed on it.

Sugar  one (1) Tablespoon.. ( I don't use this ).

Salt   ten (10) ml. That's what the original recipe stated. If you don't like that amount change to your taste.

Yeast  one packet (dry) 7 Grms.

Milk Powder  two (2) Tablespoons.

----------------------------------------------------------

Breadmaker.. round  Cake tin 230 mm diam and 36mm lip. Greaseproof paper. Baking tray.

 

My Breadmaker uses the Liquid first method.

Add contents to Breadmaker and use the Dough cycle.

After the Dough cycle has finished turn out onto heavily floured surface.With Flour on hands knock back and fold several times.

Then fold into a ball, place into Greaseproof papered  cake tin . ( doesn't matter where because the dough will fill the tin during the rise.

Place in draught free area. ( I use my Mini oven). After four to five ( 4 to 5 ) hours dough will have quadrupled in size.

Place baking tray in the bottom of oven and preheat  to 220deg Celsius ( the heated tray ensures that the bottom gets cooked ). Place dish with the Dough in it in oven onto heated tray. Bake for 20 minutes.

The finished product will be Golden Brown with a soft inner and a crust no thicker than 1mm.

I also flour it with Rice Flour and move the bread up to the top of the oven for the last five minutes.

 

eddieb's picture
eddieb

There's no fool like an old fool springs to mind.

I have just realised why  consternation has prevailed over my recipe. The forum members who know what they're talking about re measurements ( where as I didn't )  were confused by the use of mills = ml when I should have used grams.

This came about because I noticed whilst playing around with my scales that the difference between ml and gram is miniscule. Consequently whilst writing the recipe I had the scale set on ml. My humble  apologies for the confusion.

I would have preferred to edit the original post but this site doesn't appear to allow this and simply makes a copy which can then be edited and posted way down the thread.