The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

HELP! occasional failure to rise much (baker's yeast formulas)

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cognitivefun's picture
cognitivefun

HELP! occasional failure to rise much (baker's yeast formulas)

Sometimes I make a sourdough loaf and a baker's yeast loaf. Sometimes the sourdough loaf rises nicely while the baker's yeast one doesn't.

I use instant yeast that proofs up well (when I do proof it, usually I don't.) Typical formulas will include

 

2 tablespoons of butter,

 

3C of King Arthur bread flour (sorry but I don't use a scale),

2tspns fine seasalt,

3 tablespoons buttermilk powder

Water

I use the food processor method.

 

Today, I started my bulk fermentation and it took 5 or 6 hours to rise maybe 50%, at 74F. temperature. I proofed it for hours and it didn't oven rise. The loaf is fairly dense, tasty but not fluffy.

 

This happens sometimes, and other times it does not. Any suggestions? Thanks!!

 

--Richard

 

 

 

 

SDbaker's picture
SDbaker

Richard, I've only used the food processor once for pizza dough and noticed that the temp was Very warm, more due to my inexperience with that method and the machine being such a powerful tool.  Curious what is the final dough temp after processing - getting up to 140 will kill the yeasties.  Is your temp fairly consistent each batch? 

SD Baker

cognitivefun's picture
cognitivefun

The temperature is consistently around 80F.

mkelly27's picture
mkelly27

Hand mixing your next batch to find out what "really" going on. 

 It could be any number of things but hand mixing is going to give you a better feel for what's going on in your dough.  It looks from your ingredient list you are shooting for a "Pullman" type (sandwich loaf).  this type of enriched dough does well with gentle mixing, not food processor torture.  Take your time and hand mix the next one , you may be surprised

 

Mike 

_______________________________________________________

Two wrongs don't make a right. Three lefts make a right

rcornwall's picture
rcornwall

Richard, I dont like the food processor because of heat from excessive friction. You can compensate bay using a formula used in professional bakeries. It helps you determine what temperature the water should be to get a good rise. First you take your desired dough temp (ideally 74- 78 f) times 3. Then you add the actual temperature of your flour to the room temperature plus 20 f. Step 2 minus step one is what your desireable water temp should be. If you want to keep using the food processor, then take into consideration the heat from friction and lower the water temp a few degrees to compensate. You should end up with better results.

rcornwall

SDbaker's picture
SDbaker

I think he did mention that his final dough temp is consistently at 80 - but I agree food processor heat can build quickly if done incorrectly and 80 is on the warmer side.

Another way to use your formula is to calculate the actual friction factor of the processor itself on this dough for more precision.  Simply use known room, water, flour temps, use the processor for the desired time, read the final dough temp and solve for the friction factor for your actual machine.  This same technique can be used for better results in short/improved/intensive bread dough recipes for consistent proofing times.

 SD Baker

cognitivefun's picture
cognitivefun

I've been making bread in the food processor for awhile now with few/no problems. Hmmmmm....

SDbaker's picture
SDbaker

CF - would you be interested in starting a thread on food processor best practices? 

SD Baker