The Fresh Loaf

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My best Tartine Country Loaves

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David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

My best Tartine Country Loaves

I have been baking these breads for several months.  I typically use my unfed (for a week) starter straight from the fridge, mix it with 200 grams of water, 100 grams of King Arthur AP and 100 grams of King Arthur White Whole Wheat.

This last time, I made the leaven on Thursday morning, stuck it in the fridge on Thursday night and mixed dough for two loaves Friday night giving it a few turns over the course of 3 hours, shaped and placed in the fridge overnight.  I baked the next morning and the results are the top and bottom loaves. They were underwhelming in terms of size. I gave them away without cutting them.  However, on Saturday, I took the remaining 200 grams of leaven (made Thursday) and mixed up enough dough for two more loaves. I turned at 30 minutes, and three more times over the next 3.5 hours. Shaped, and stuck in the fridge.  Those loaves are the ones on the cooling rack. They bloomed very nicely.

The crumb was just what I want -- soft, chewy and tangy.  It was spectacular.  And no big holes through which peanut butter and jelly can escape.

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

for the middle loaves, stored in the fridge over that time or on the counter?  That was the only change right?  This extra 24 hours for the levain really made a huge difference.  Those middle loaves look very nice inside and out. Well Done.

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

I made the levain Thursday morning and stuck it in the fridge Thursday evening. I only took it out for 30 minutes or so Friday night, measured out my 200 grams and stuck it back in the fridge. I was going to make waffles with it on Saturday but when the loaves did not come out as I had hoped, I just made more dough with it from the fridge. I warmed up my 700 grams water to 90 degrees to mix with the cold leaven. 

However, this was not the only change. For the top and bottom loaves I did the bulk fermentation and turns in a much shorter period of time (3 hours) before putting them in the fridge overnight. For the side loaves, I let them bulk ferment for the full 4 hours and the dough was much more developed before shaping. 

I like to see bubbles at the surface before shaping. I did not have them in the top loaves, but had them in the side by side loaves. 

Stuart Borken's picture
Stuart Borken

those breads look like the most perfect home made artisan breads.

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

Everything about the one I have been eating is exquisite. Crisp and thin crust. Super soft interior but with a great chew. It was a little had to cut because the loaf wanted to collapse under he pressure of my knife once the crust was cut but it held up great to peanut butter or smart balance butter being spread on it. 

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

This one was made using my unfed starter straight from the fridge.  I added the 200 grams of water, 100 grams of AP and 100 grams of White whole wheat, and let it sit on the counter from Thursday night to Friday afternoon, at which point it went into the fridge (probably tripled in size).  I mixed the dough on Saturday morning, shaped it in the afternoon after 5-6 turns over 4 hours, and baked Sunday morning.  I did not take a picture of the crumb, but it is delicious, soft and chewy and the crust is outstanding.

I took a tip from something I read, and I just cut the bread and left it standing on my cutting board, cut side down.  This morning, it felt as fresh as when I cut it.  Well, maybe it was less fresh, but it definitely had not started to get stale like I usually find if it is exposed directly to air.

This bread is delicious.The crust is fantastic, the chew is ideal.  The only thing I regret is putting my sandwich in a ziplock bag this morning.