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Delaying fermentation

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proof419's picture
proof419

Delaying fermentation

I love my naturally risen breads.  However, I'm trying to delay fermentation so I can mix dough one evening, and bake the next evening.  

I follow something like the tartine process.  If I change the proportions of leaven to dough so that it will take 24 hours for the bulk ferment do you think the dough will be more sour than sweet?

Refrigeration is not an option, due to space and the quantity of dough I'm working with.

I'd appreciate any input from more experienced bakers than myself!

Thanks!

ericreed's picture
ericreed

But Ken Forkish has a version that might fit your schedule. His sample timeline is to feed the levain at 9 am, mix the dough at 5 pm, shape at 8 am the next morning, and bake at noon. 27 hours total. Here's a rundown of the recipe.

http://www.karenskitchenstories.com/2013/06/pure-levain-country-bread.html

Pictures are kinda bad there. This is my one attempt, although my sourdough starter was not quite right at the time. Still working on that.

 

kenny10099@hotmail.com's picture
kenny10099@hotm...

Actually you have three options to optimize the sour.

1 - If you add the standard ratio of the yeast and salt, it will be more sour than sweet. 

Optionally you can change the amount of the yeast and salt.

2 - If you want to have a bit salty you can add extra salt and it will make the fermentation delayed but the taste of the bread will be salty. 

3 - If you do not want to have a salty bread. Then you can add less yeast than the standard amount you add. 

Could you tell me that you add salt before adding yeast or after adding yeast? Sometime it can be very important for sour dough bread. 

Salt always reduces the yeast reaction.Some bakeries add salt to the dough before the yeast and reduces the quantity of the yeast (especially instant yeast). So they can wait for the dough more than 24 hours. It will not become more sour or it can be less sour if they want. Please attention to here, the purpose is just to control the fermentation when they produce special sour breads. 

 

proof419's picture
proof419

Thanks for the replies!

I'm interested in Forkish. I'll have to check him out!

I mix the leaven in with the dough and rest for an hour before adding salt and reserved water.  I'll probably just increase the amount of dough and decrease the leaven and see how it works.

I'd be happy for any more input!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

that did nit include the levain but would include the salt and extra water to squish it through yor fingers half way through the autolyse.  Slowing down the effects of the levain on the dough is the key to your success.   For me to get to 24 hours of retard from 12 hours I usually do,  I have to cut the levai  by 66% instead of 50%.  Logically you would think that half the levain would work out to twice the retard time but it doesn't work that way for me.  Since you would be putting the alt in earlier maybe a 60% reduction in levain  would work.  You will have to do some experimenting to get it the way you want at 24 hours. 

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

Time and temperature are two very important variables as well. You may accomplish what you want by using cool or cold water to delay the fermentation. Might even use cold flour.   Take the temperature of your dough when mixes. See how that temperature combined with room temperature and rising time works for you. If it rose too much, use colder ingredients and try again. Rose too little, warm up the water and try again, noting the dough temperature. 

kenny10099@hotmail.com's picture
kenny10099@hotm...

Dear David Hello, 

Yes time and temperature are very important for all dough but if it is about the delay fermentation then I would like to remind you of something about the time. 

We do not talk about any limited time such as 45 min or 2 hours.  It is about 24 hours for the bulk ferment. Therefore the yeast will work very well and it will certainly compensate the lack of the sufficient temperature at least 1 or 1.5 hours.

 

proof419's picture
proof419

Good tip!  I'll definitely take that into consideration.  I also thought about accomplishing the bulk rise at cellar temp, since I have a basement to use.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

will slow the reproductive rate of yeast by almost 80% and will make a big difference.

kenny10099@hotmail.com's picture
kenny10099@hotm...

This is true. He should try

proof419's picture
proof419

I think a combination of less leaven and cellaring is going to be my first attempt. 

This is very helpful.