The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

KA Pro 600 - Noisy Gearbox?

  • Pin It
VinumVita's picture
VinumVita

KA Pro 600 - Noisy Gearbox?

Hello All... I'm new to bread baking and have recently bought my first stand up mixer, a KitchenAid Pro 600 (RKP26M1XPM). I bought the unit refurbished and am now concerned having read about the trouble people have had with these unit's gearboxes.

I've noticed that when on low speed (stir), the unit occasionally makes a particularly troubling noise.  The video below demonstrates the issue.  I am hoping that someone will tell me if this is a typical sounds for the unit or if I should consider having it repaired under its warranty.

Thanks.

-- Terrence

(Please adjust your speakers before playing... the sound is noisy!)

KitchenAid Pro 600 Stir 

 




Here is a link to the unit operating on speed 2.  This seems ok to me.

 

 

 

 

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I recently bought a KA mixer at a local thrift store that sounded much worse than that. The mixer looked almost unused and knowing how easily repairable KA can be, I took a chance. When my repairman (translation-spouse)opened it up, it appeared the unit was not in the correct position in the line when the grease was dropped onto the gears-totally missed. We greased it up and it works great-no more noise.

 

Greg D's picture
Greg D

You mention your machine is under warranty.  I would pursue a warranty claim if I were you.  For those without warranty or who want to understand their KA problems, I strongly recommend this YouTube video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lsbgUHAGWX4&index=5&list=PLfgSq7jBiq4I-mii-zHqa-VSRsM1HLctu

I burnt up the gear(s) in my KA by mixing way too many batches of Peter Reinhart's bagels from Crust and Crumb.  Repair was pretty simple following the You Tube instructions.

 

Happy Baking.

 

davidg618's picture
davidg618

Without a calibrated recording or a referenced, calibrated measurement, and a calibrated receiver there's no way we can can accurately compare the volume of your Pro 600 against another.

I bought a refurbished Pro 600 three years ago. It had a sticker on it specifically advertising metal gears. I understand the original units contained plastic gears, but I've not verified it. Mine gets used at least weekly mixing, on average, 2 kg of bread doughs for sourdoughs, bagels, and butter cookies. I also use it to grind, on average, 8 kg of meats for hamburger or sausage.

So far, I've had no problems, no breakdowns, and the drive housing has only been warm occasionally, never hot to the touch.

Your recording, sounds about the same as mine, but cannot judge the volume of its sound.

David G

VinumVita's picture
VinumVita

Thanks for the reply.  I'll note that it is not the volume of the noise that concerns me, but there is a particular sound that is suspicious.  The unit only makes this particular sound on stir.  My recording of speed 2 shows the unit making a very consistent noise compared to stir.

I suppose the question is: Should the mixer on stir make a consistent whirling noise or is the "rising / falling" noise that mine makes typical?  It sounds like a loose gear system to be, but again I don't have anything for comparison.

davidg618's picture
davidg618

I noticed most of the dough hook is exposed, i.e. the mixer is very lightly loaded. In my earlier remark I was comparing apples-and-apples: the sound my mixer makes lightly loaded on speed 1. However, on speed 1, I load flour into the wet ingredients a ladle at a time. As the load increases the gear noise changes. The best way I can describe that change is "tighter", less spread spectrum, just like a car or truck's gear (manual shift transmission) sounds when loaded at a constant speed.

When I'm grinding meat I start on speed 1, and switch to speed 2. When the load lightens near the end I hear the same kind of noise change reversed.

I don't think you have a problem, but I obviously can't guarantee that.

David G

chris319's picture
chris319

KitchenAid mixers have never had plastic gears, except for the failsafe gear which is designed to fail if the mixer is overloaded, thus preventing damage to the motor. That design goes back to the Hobart era.

Some latter KA mixers used to have a plastic gear housing, which is not the same as a gear. The plastic gear housing was a disaster and they no longer use it.