The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bread pans

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jimpsr's picture
jimpsr

Bread pans

Hi, I'm brand new here so I hope that I'm in the right place. I haven't baked my first loaf yet and I have a question about pans.I have seen several recipes  that call for 1 or 2 lb. bread pans. However, when looking at pans online, I haven't seen any product descriptions that mention pound. Can someone educate me?  Thank you.

andychrist's picture
andychrist

A one pound pan would be equivalent to about a quart. You might also see pans listed by dimension, I think a two quart pan would be about 9x5x3".  Pullman pans are marketed by weight, you can easily find them in the two pound size.

jimpsr's picture
jimpsr

Thanks for your quick and informative reply. I think that I'm almost ready to dive in to this.

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

There are lots of ways to skin a cat!  If you're embarking on the project of learning bread baking, consider this: those intending to work as bakers take courses.  This allows them to condense and organize therefore shorten their learning process.  Unless you're going to take such a course, you can mimic one by choosing the text book written for such a course and work your way through it.  A good text book will organize your studying, giving you a way to learn step by step.  Mind you, bread cook books are not text books.  Here are two very different text books worth choosing between:  DiMuzio's Bread Baking and Hamelman's Bread.  You may be able to check them out in your local library.  They're generally available used at Alibris or Powell's Books.  Looking back on my own baking experience, I absolutely know that DiMuzio's book would've been better for me than Hamelman's.  You might choose differently.  Check them out.

Also, as soon as you've the time, watch as many of the videos for which there are links at the top of any The Fresh Loaf page.  You may not understand why you're watching them initially, but some time down the line you'll remember that you'd seen a video on exactly the problem you're trying to solve.  Remember that so much of bread baking has to do with hand/arm movements and the exact feel of a dough.  Or maybe something like how to do a gluten window test.  These are things a book can never show you as well as a video can.

Then there's finding out whether there's a local home baker who's willing to teach you and/or talk to you in real time on occasion.

Finally, once you start baking, practice a lot.  Make mistakes and try again.  It's fun.

 

jimpsr's picture
jimpsr

What a terrific reply! Thank you for the welcome and the great suggestions! I'm going to follow you advice and then get started. Thanks again.