The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

All Things Bread - coming back to home made

Dolly's picture
Dolly

All Things Bread - coming back to home made

How long has it been since anyone has thought of the Tassajara bread book? I actually have a 1978, twenty first printing, copy of what to me back then was the ultimate zen bread bible. Much water has flowed under the bridge, I've left bread baking, come back to it, on may occasions. I have started and done away with more sourdough starters than I can count. Now I'm back baking with a vengence, obsessing over artisan style loaves, no knead 1869 recipes, growing a starter that is being very generous to me. For the last six months I've been baking all my families bread. Hubby loves it, the kids like certain things like French bread, pass on the seven grain, gobble the cinnamon buns, devour grandma's bun recipe but still look longingly at their favourite cardboard foam bread when we pass it in the supermarket. I figure another 3 months and they will stop. They are getting more adventerous; they are beginning to realize we won't be going back.

What has promted this rennaisance? Heath issues that force me to retire? Turning 50? Being concerned about what goes into our food? What ever it is, I love my homecoming. I am having fun.

Comments

fleur-de-liz's picture
fleur-de-liz

and still has pages with caked on flour!  Tassajara had so much to offer -- the sponge method was a major breakthrough for me at the time.  And, I loved that there was a master recipe that you could adapt to whatever grains you wished to use.  The book really improved my bread but it also made me feel like I was part of a greater community.

Like you, I have strayed from bread baking and am a recent returnee.  Loving every minute of it but still cherishing the old Tassajara Bread Book.

Liz

Dolly's picture
Dolly

using the master recipe for a change from what I've been baking and to celebrate finding someone who feels that same way about that old book. So glad someone else remembers it. Mine too has caked on flour, what looks like a few oil stains and I know there were a few tears dropped on those pages once or twice. Thnaks Liz

 Dolly

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Hi Dolly and welcome to The Fresh Loaf. I'm another newer baker and totally obsessed, and as someone pointed out the other day, even the disasters taste good. I have never heard of the Tassajara bread book and would love to know what was so special about it? Sounds like a very well loved book and I wonder whether it is possible to find a copy these days, or is it yet another long lost friend? A.

Dolly's picture
Dolly

on amazon.com and you can get what looks like a nice 25th anniversary copy. Also I saw a listing for a used copy for 3 something. I learned how to bake bread by trial and error following directions in the Joy of Cooking, if you can believe it, but my bread never came to life until I got a copy of the Tassajara Bread Book and followed the directions for the master recipe. Wow what a change. It was like an education in love and respect for yeasty things and yeast and I have got along like pals ever since. In an era of the Vegetarian Epicure, and Moosewood Cookbook, there came the Tassajara Bread Book just to wake us all up I think. Me anyaway.

Thanks for the welcome AnnieT

Dolly