The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

anyone not using a flaker??

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toddvp's picture
toddvp

anyone not using a flaker??

Hi! Working my way through the new Tartine book, and excited about the idea of fermenting flaked grains, etc. Seems more economical/possible to flake my own than to track down pre-flaked specialty grains, so I'm on the search.

With that in mind, does anyone have a flaker lying around that they're tired of? I'd like to buy "quality used" if possible rather than "new and cheap", since like I'm sure many of you know, the bread habit can suck the budget dry pretty quickly.

Let me know -- thanks!

 

-Todd

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Todd,

I have a flaker and will tell you that grains other than oats are hard to flake.  Due to their hardness they end to crumble so you get cracked grains rather than flakes….

Janet

toddvp's picture
toddvp

thanks Janet -- I've seen that being said as I've looked stuff up. Supposedly the advice is to increase the moisture content slightly before flaking (tiny amount of water distributed around grains until it's absorbed) so they roll easier. Are you ready to give yours up, or just passing on your experience?

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

I too know about the soaking bit but I don't do it :)  I just flake oats with my FlicFloc and any other grains that I want to add to liven things up in a loaf go in as milled flour since I also grind my own grains. 

Sorry, I don't want to part with my flaker either.

Good Luck,

Janet

MangoChutney's picture
MangoChutney

Todd,

You are correct that hydrating the grains, other than oats, makes flaking them easier.  The Flocino flaker instructions say to rinse them under running water and then spread them out for 3 to 4 hours before running them through the flaker.  I am not interested in selling my Flocino, by the way.  *grin*

 

toddvp's picture
toddvp

haha that's fine I suppose. Thanks for the confirmation/good advice!