The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

How to keep Fresh Bread Fresh...

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Registeed111's picture
Registeed111

How to keep Fresh Bread Fresh...

I am 65 years old and grew up on a farm baking everything (pies, cookies, breads,roll, etc) once a week....our flour was milled at a neighboring farm, and there were absolutely no preservatives in anything! Of course, things were delicious and usually quickly consumed. I learned from my grandmother how to store these items. We stored our bread in a closed tin bread box, on the counter, with an uncut apple...It keeps everything moist. I use the firmest and smallest apple I can find. Years ago, I just went and got one off the tree.The apple could be reused until it got soft, and it often lasted weeks!  The bread doesn't have to be wrapped. The apple keeps things soft, so do not put anything in with the bread that is crisp (like crisp chocolate chip cookies), as they will soften up  some. (They are,however, still delicious!), and if you have to "re crisp" anything, just pop it (uncovered) into the oven. If you do not have a tin bread box, store the bread with the apple in it's orignal, closed  wrapper or a plastic container (i.e.Tupperware). If you have some fresh bread that has a "crusty crust," it can be put into the oven, uncovered, for a few minutes and it will regain its original crust character. Currently, I have a  loaf of bread that I made a week and a half ago, and it is still delicious and has no mold. Usually, however,  I use this week old bread for toast, croutons, bread puddings, french toast, as I have already made some fresher bread. I do not know if other fruits or vegetables work because the apple is so easy.

Now, when you open the box or container of bread, it may smell like an apple, but the bread  won't taste like one. Please let me know how  this works for you or if you have tried another fruit or vegetable.    Jane

Comments

Registeed111's picture
Registeed111

Bon Apetit!

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Thank you for sharing your knowledge Jane.

I am saving my pennies for one of these.

http://www.amazon.com/Wesco-Full-Grandy-Bread-White/dp/B002FAW57E/ref=sr_1_4?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1390773283&sr=1-4&keywords=Wesco+bread+box

Cheers,

Wingnut

Registeed111's picture
Registeed111

That is a nice bread box. However, they are frequently found at yard sales, and antique/flea markets. I have my grandmother's original one, but I have seen them fairly priced on EBay, which is probably the best place to get an vintage one. I wouldn't pay over $65.00 for one, but being older, they come in various conditions and designs. They are also in Big Box stores. They are pretty displayed on the counter and a great conversation piece, as a lot of folks won't know what they are. 

MisterTT's picture
MisterTT

It is clear that an apple cannot influence temperature inside the bread box. I think it's also reasonable that, with skin intact, its impact on humidity will be minuscule, especially if you open the box a few times a day. So what remains is some biological reason?

I'm thinking that maybe the apple is secondary to having a good, airtight container which doesn't let the bread dry out.

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Maybe it's the Ethylene Gas?

Just a guess.

Cheers,

Wingnut