The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Dutch pancake

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yancypup's picture
yancypup

Dutch pancake

In Holland, they have these Dutch pancake restaurants.   They call these pancakes (forgive my misspelling) pannekoek and they are much closer to a pizza than to a pancake.  They are baked and topped with your choice of topping.  Cheese (kaas) and bacon (spek) are popular.  I think they are yeasted.  Does anyone know how to make these?

Antilope's picture
Antilope

You can search in Holland on the ".NL" domain for pancake recipes.
If you use Google Chrome browser, it will translate the Dutch web pages into English for you.

First go to Bing Translate:

http://www.bing.com/translator

Translate "pancake recipes" into Dutch: "pannenkoek recepten"


Go to Google Advanced Search:


http://www.google.com/advanced_search?hl=en

Under the "site or domain" field - enter: .nl

Under the "all of these words" field - enter: pannenkoek recepten


Google will display links to pancake recipes in Holland.

Google Chrome  will translate those links to English.

When you click on a link, Google Chrome will translate the web page from Dutch to English.

Example of a search:

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&as_q=pannenkoek+recepten&as_epq=&as_oq=&as_eq=&as_nlo=&as_nhi=&lr=&cr=&as_qdr=all&as_sitesearch=.nl&as_occt=any&sa...

henkverhaar's picture
henkverhaar

Actually, they're nothing like a pizza - the basis is formed by a yeasted batter. Although most people here, when they make pannenkoeken, make something that is more akin to French crepes, called 'flensjes' in Dutch. Which are made with a thinner, eggier, non-yeasted batter.

Personally, I only make sourdough/baking soda pancakes these days, with a batter consisting of 120 g (1:1) sourdough starter, 185 g AP flour, 300 mL milk, 20 g invert-sugar or corn syrup or honey, a pinch of salt, 1 egg, a pinch of baking soda and 20 g molten butter. (the starter, flour, milk and sugar are mixed and fermented overnight, the salt, baking soda, egg and butter are mixed in just before baking. Bake in a smallish skillet. This batter is rather thick and makes US style pancakes.

yancypup's picture
yancypup

I also make sourdough pancakes using only soda, salt cooking oil and sourdough.  But the dutch pannekoeken I had in the 70s hand a chewy crust similar to pizza and was almost always topped with cheese.  Do you know the technique to make these?  I have a lodge solid cast iron pizza pan.  I had though I might pour in some thick batter, yeasted or sourdough, bake until partially done, top with cheese and finish baking.  What do you think?  Is that any way similar to the way Dutch restaurants do it?  I know they use a special pan.  I have no idea what temp they bake at.  Thanks in advance, Dan. 

henkverhaar's picture
henkverhaar

Pretty much similar, although they normally sprinkle on the cheese almost directly after introducing the batter into the skillet. Technique is primarily temperature control. A heavy cast iron skillet or pizza pan is almost ideal, if you have the patience to let it come up to temperature before starting baking. I personally prefer a thick heavy sheet steel frying pan (probably 1/6 inch thick sheet steel) for pancakes. Heavy ceramic-lined frying pans will also work - the defining characteristic is mass rather than material.

Also very good are bacon pancakes. Start with bacon, fry until halfway crisp and then pour in the batter.

My personal favourite is bacon pancakes with stem ginger in syrup.

A fairly standard recipe for pancake batter would be 300 g AP flour, 1 egg, 8 g active dry yeast (about 5 g instant dry yeast) 500 mL milk, teaspoon salt. Make a smooth batter (use less milk for thicker pancakes), and let proof until fairly active. Bake in a skillet over medium heat. Bottom should be nicely coloured but not burnt when the top is just dry. Flip and bake the other side. Getting the heat just right is the trick here. The mass/heat retention of the heavy skillet helps here, although it is/was common to mess up the first pancake due to not waiting long enough for the skillet to come up to temperature...

yancypup's picture
yancypup

Thanks, this is the information I was looking for!  I was afraid you would tell me to flip them.  I have a feeling I'm going to decorate my kitchen floor until I get the technique down.  I suppose a pizza peel would work.  I remember eating them in a restaurant in Utrecht built below street level at the canal level and loving them.  I did eat some with kaas and spek, those were my favorite.

henkverhaar's picture
henkverhaar

You can flip them with a utensil - dunno what the correct Englsh name would be, rather than by that always-good-for-a-hilarious-scene-in-a-cartoon flick of the wrist with the skillet...