The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Rye bread

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tomjtom's picture
tomjtom

Rye bread

Hello. I'm a new member to this site. I am interested in making rye bread I have recently learned that rye is better for you than wheat, however I typically eat New York style Jewish rye bread and love it. Through some research I have conducted I have found that this bread has enriched wheat flour more than it has rye. Are these ingredients as healthy for you as just using rye flour? What kind of rye flour would you good people recommend? Can you make bread out of just rye, and if so what type of rye? I have noticed that there are varying degrees of proccesed rye. Is there such a thing as whole rye? Thanks for any help with this matter. TJT

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

is richer in fiber, mineral salts, wild yeasts and especially TASTE than medium or light rye flours.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

 "...rye is better for you than wheat..."   I agree.

"What kind of rye flour would you good people recommend?"

 Anything you can get ahold of.  A fine ground flour for starters."

"Can you make bread out of just rye, and if so what type of rye?"  

Yes you can.  100% rye breads tend to be dark, have some weight to them, tasty moist breads known as vollkorn ryes.  More common are those around 75 to 80% rye.  Spelt (ancient wheat) is a good flour to combine with Rye.  Rye comes as fine flour, coarse rye, chops or chunks and as whole berries (no hull) and can be combined for interesting crumb effects.  Availability depends on your location and shipping costs.

"I have noticed that there are varying degrees of proccesed rye. Is there such a thing as whole rye?  

Yes.  Look at the protein, carbohydrate and fiber per gram counts given with the flour.  That should tell you more about what you are dealing with.  The higher the fiber, the more whole the flour,  Also higher protein counts and lower carbohydrate counts indicate more whole flour.  Compare packages.  As you compare you will see great differences to wheat. Most bags do not list ash content, but it will also be higher with whole rye flour.  Rye is not a wheat and will act very different to wheat, so do research into how to play with it.  

If you want to get great flavour with high rye baking, then I (without scaring you off) suggest you get started on making a rye sourdough wild yeast starter culture to use with the rye flour.  It is rather easy, takes a week (or so) but will help to get good results with rye bread.  There are other ways to get sour into rye dough using buttermilk and other fermented products but for weekly rye baking, I say, nothing beats a rye starter for raising a rye loaf, even when it is only a small rise.

Mini O-rye

tomjtom's picture
tomjtom

Thanks for a great anwswer Mini. Where should I look to find a rye sourdough wild yeast starter culture and rye flour? how about a recipe on how to proceed? I'm a real rookie at this but am willing to learn. Many Thanks TJT

dosco's picture
dosco

The Reinhart Jewish Deli Rye from BBA is about 44% rye flour, the remainder is bread flour.

Of course you could go with 100% rye ... it will be darker and the crumb will be smaller/more closed.

What kind of bread texture do you like? Light, medium, or heavy?

Cheers-
Dave

tomjtom's picture
tomjtom

Hello Dave I seem to like medium to heavy bread. Where would I buy 100% rye flour? Some of the things I've read online seem to suggest that it would be hard to make 100% rye am I misinterpreting that? Thanks, TJT

dosco's picture
dosco

Medium bread would probably be a Jewish Deli Rye along the lines of Reinhart's (44% rye, remainder bread flour).

Heavy would be a 100% rye as Mini Oven specified.

Recipes for many types of rye are on this site, suggest you take a look at Dave Snyder's (username = dmsnyder) recipe index.

Yes, because rye is low in gluten and high in pentosans, it is sticky and handles differently than wheat breads. Not the end of the world by any stretch of the imagination.

I got some medium rye flour from my local grocery store. The local "health food store" seems to have quite an interesting selection as well.

Cheers-
Dave

andychrist's picture
andychrist

And don't forget the caraway seed!  Even "unseeded" Jewish rye or pumpernickel will typically contain ground caraway seed (and often traces of onion as well.) This probably gives more flavor to the bread than the rye itself, at least from my experience.  Have fun!