The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

I made the HAMBURGER BUNS, BILL

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weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

I made the HAMBURGER BUNS, BILL

Hi Bill,Check out my BLOG and see the hamburger and hot dog rolls I made today. They didn't come out as pretty as yours but they taste so good. Thanks for the great recipe.                                                                                                             weavershouse

bwraith's picture
bwraith

Hi weavershouse,

I saw them. They look great. Good work using the fresh garden tomatoes and lettuce. I've always wanted to make the perfect hamburger, but without tomatoes and lettuce straight out of the garden, it has no chance for true perfection, even though the freshly baked buns bring us well along the path toward the perfect hamburger.

Bill

MysticBunny's picture
MysticBunny

Hi,

I'm new here and just found this posting about hamburger & hotdog buns.  Do you by chance have the recipe for them handy?  I've been wanting to make them for ages but have yet to find someone who has actually made them with a 'tried' recipe.  I don't have any forms like the ones I saw on King Arthur's site (as I live in the UK) but had an idea to use Yorkshire pudding tins which are about the same size to hold their shape.  Did you do this or were they all free form?  What about the hotdog rolls?  For those I will have to do free form but at least hubby is happy to eat them however they come out.  Thanks in advance.

MysticBunny

http://www.bakerlady.com
bwraith's picture
bwraith

Hi MysticBunny,

I blogged a recipe for "A Hamburger Bun" that at least a few have tried.

Bill

MysticBunny's picture
MysticBunny

Hi,

Thanks for the recipe.  I did search but must admit time was limited and I'm often blind (well that's the story I'm sticking to!).  

I am assuming AP = All-purpose flour?  Sorry sometimes I do not always know the lingo.  I have been baking my own break for several years now (by hand mostly) and have slowly been making my way through other things as well.  I have always made my own Pitas (which got me to make my own bread) however; I make them slightly different from the recipe posted here (it starts overnight which I find gives it more flavour).  I also now do my own flour/corn tortillas and have sworn off the kinds you buy now – too full of junk instead of what they should be. 

Anyway, thanks and I will give them a go and let you know how I get on. 

MysticBunny 

http://www.bakerlady.com

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

Mystic Bunny, I'd love to have your pita bread recipe.

30 years ago I drove clear across town to an ethnic grocery to buy pita breads. Now they're available in most grocery stores, but not particularly fresh. I've been substituting flour tortillas, which I can get hot off the grill at the local grocer.

MysticBunny's picture
MysticBunny

Hi KipperCat,

The recipe is posted on my website below and it is quite easy.  I make the sponge the night before and let it sit.  I can then make pitas that morning (if I am making them for lunch) or it can wait until I come home later that evening to make dinner.  Honestly, the longer it sits the better the dough!

I have omitted the sugar when I know the dough will be used the next day in its entirety.  Otherwise, use the sugar to keep the dough going if you need to refrigerate it (I can get several days of pitas if I don't want to use all the dough in one go).  I also only use about a teaspoon of salt (probably less) depending on what I am doing with the dough.

I love this recipe the most and always return to it even when I have tried others.  I got it originally off I believe the King Arthur site but I adapted it to my life.   I also had to adapt it to metric since that is how everything is sold in the UK – one must do as the natives.

I also use the dough to make what I call pita pockets (yes, that's some junk made by someone else but I nicked the name).  I roll an especially large ball of dough out to a circle and fill it with what I have in the fridge (ham, cheese, roast turkey/chicken, tomatoes, olives - the list is exhaustive).  I then fold it over (rather like a calzone or pasty) and crimp the edges.  I pop it on the pizza stone and cook for about 15 minutes or so (depending on fillings, dough thickness, etc.) and you have a hot pocket the way you like with what you know is in it!

Enjoy and hope you like it!

MysticBunny 

http://www.bakerlady.com

bluezebra's picture
bluezebra

try making your pita pockets.

We just bought pitas from a halal butcher this week...and omg. They are soooo bad. Pre-made factory stuff that reminded me of why I haven't had a pita in a longgggg time.

I also love your idea of making homemade "hot pockets"!

Thanks for sharing!

MysticBunny's picture
MysticBunny

Hi Bluezebra,

I know – the pitas that you can purchase here are bad.  I never would have started on making them had one day we wanted them with our hummus.  Do you think we could find any?  No.  So I decided then and there to make my own. 

We have not looked back.  I think once you have success with something you naturally progress.  I have always (thanks to my mother) been a good cook but my repertoire has expanded dramatically since I have moved here to the UK.  I could not find what I was used to and most items here are too salty or sickly sweet.  This means you have to find way to get what you want and that is usually by doing it yourself. 

I tend to make many things up as I go along while looking at recipes for inspiration they are only my guide.  Baking is more an exact science, which necessitates following the recipe.  Bread however, seems to allow for a greater amount of creativity that suits me in my dangerous moments.

Good luck and I am sure you will enjoy them.  They are so easy and once made you never go back…

MysticBunny

http://www.bakerlady.com

bluezebra's picture
bluezebra

:D Cheers!

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

Thanks MysticBunny, I pulled your recipe and plan to make it one day soon. I'm curious though - you specify to not use stainless bowls or utensils for this, but not your other bread doughs. Any idea why this one is different in that regard?

MysticBunny's picture
MysticBunny

Hi KipperCat,

I believe this goes back to starters/sponges when first reading about them they said to use this type of method. I cannot remmeber why stainless steel was not to be used but when doing some research on pitas and this recipe I combined the two and it seems to work.

My bread I make in a stainless bowl - mostly because it rises faster when sitting in the sun (I use solar power especially during the winter months - well when we have sun that is!). I also cook the bread in a stainless steel pan but most are like this (unless you buy one of those teflon kinds).

But something that sits - especially a starter/sponge should be done this way. If I find/remember the reason why I'll post it - will have to do some digging in my bread books but I have so many it might be a while!

MysticBunny

http://www.bakerlady.com

browndog's picture
browndog

Equipment made of 'reactive ' metals such as aluminum, copper and iron, can leach into acidic foods, particularly if said food is meant to sit awhile--like starter. That's why cooking tomato sauce, for example, in cast iron contributes to dietary iron. Stainless steel seems to occupy a grey area (ha), it's considered non-reactive but there's debate...I'd assume that's the reason behind MysticBunny's recipe directive. Some bread book of mine actually insists that all dough be made in non-metal bowls, which I always appreciate from an aesthetics view, as I toss a pound of flour into my big stainless bowl.

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

MysticBunny & Browndog

I forgot all about the metal thing when I started my Pita Dough last night.  So I used my stainless steel bowl as usual.  I also varied both the formula and the method, so who knows what I'll get?  I'm really not knowledgeable enough to play this fast & loose with breads, but am used to doing so with other cooking. However it turns out, I'll post it in my blog.

MysticBunny's picture
MysticBunny

Hi KipperCat,

I tend not to measure my flour anymore I guess I have made them so often it doesn't matter.  Once you come to mix your sponge with your additional flour and salt, you want a dough that's soft and supple but not too dry.  It should feel the same as bread dough when making that. 

While I will often measure when first doing something if I do it enough I will just then 'estimate' the same as I do with cooking.  Good luck and I hope it all turns out well!

MysticBunny 

http://www.bakerlady.com

MysticBunny's picture
MysticBunny

Thanks Browndog - that was the reason my poor brain was on overload last night.  I guess I have just always used the pottery bowls for the sponge as well because I have lots of mid-size bowls and they are perfect for this beginning bit of the sponge and don't take up much valuable counter space either.

MysticBunny 

http://www.bakerlady.com

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

I used bwraith's recipe that he directs you to in the above post and it's very good. I didn't use any form for the hamburger or hotdog rolls, just hand forming. Good luck, I'm sure you'll like Bill's recipe.                                             weavershouse