The Fresh Loaf

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Tartine Country Bread 2.0

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MTK's picture
MTK

Tartine Country Bread 2.0

Recently, I'm reading Chad Robertson's Tartine Bread before sleep. His concept and method in bread baking are unique. I tried the Tartine Country loaf before reading his book, while I decide to try it again sticking to his procedure. 

Here's the recipe(I can't get good whole wheat flour here, so I replace it with whole rye flour).

1.Make the leaven. I fed my starter(4g) with 25g bread flour, 25g whole rye flour, 50g water. At 26C, it takes about five hours to pass the floating test.

2.Mix the dough. Mix all the ingredient except salt and 25g water. It's shaggy. Don't worry. Gluten will develop in later procedures.  Autolyse for 30 minute. Incorporate salt and the rest of water with the dough by hand. Transfer the dough into a plastic container.

3. Bulk fermentation. At 26C, it takes about four hour and the dough increases 20~30% in volume. Do stretch and fold every half an hour. I did 5 S&Fs. The dough is no longer shaggy but cohesive, which means good gluten development.

4. Shaping. Dough cutter is an useful tool in shaping this kind of wet dough. There's an useful shaping video  on youtube, which inspired me a lot.

Initial shaping:In this procedure, we want to incorporated as little flour as possible into the dough. Fold the side of dough onto itself so that the flour one the surface of the dough is sealed on the outside of the dough.The outer surface of the dough will be the crust, so we can use more flour to avoid sticking.

Bench rest: 30min.

Final shaping: Flip the dough so that the floured side is resting on the surface. Shape the dough like folding the envelope. Round the dough on the surface to achieve surface tension. The dough is soft and jiggling, so every movement needs to be gentle. Transfer it to the proofing basket.

5.Final proof. At 26C, it takes about 3~4 hours. At the end of this stage, I was too sleepy, so I popped it into the oven after only 3 hours. However, I think 4 hours might be better.

6.Baking. Preheat the dutch oven  40min before baking. It proves that dutch oven is the perfect device in baking this bread. It can restore heat and trap the moisture, and it's like a auto steam generator. Transfer the dough into the dutch oven and score the dough.(My scoring turns out to be awful.) Remember to wear oven mitts, otherwise it can burn your fingers. Pop it into the oven. Bake with the lid on for the first 15 minute. Take the lid out for the rest 25 minute.

There's a hugh oven spring inside the oven. And the cracking sound is the loudest I've ever heard, which owes to the dutch oven. This time, my loaf is no longer a flat bread. The volume increased a lot, comparing my last trial. The crumb is open, but still has room for improvement. I'm going to make them into some delicious sandwiches for my New Year's brunch.

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

as a tartine loaf gets - Well done!

MTK's picture
MTK

^o^ Thanks, dabrownman. I love this recipe. I wish I can eat the real tartine loaf one day.

Bakingmadtoo's picture
Bakingmadtoo

That looks really good. Nice oven spring.

Skibum's picture
Skibum

Okay I am ordering a banneton today! I like your idea of using rye rather than WW in your bake. Yet another great idea I will have to try. And the to bake list gets longer and longer . . .

Happy baking, Brian

MTK's picture
MTK

I like whole rye,too. It's not easy to buy high-quality whole grain flour. I only got a pack of whole rye, so I try. The result is satisfying. As well, it's very delicious!

holds99's picture
holds99

What a lovely loaf: beautiful crust, great oven-spring and perfect crumb.  I think the touch of rye, rather than whole wheat, imparts a nicer flavor. But then, I'm partial to rye.

Excellent baking and post,

Howard 

MTK's picture
MTK

Your comment is encouraging. It's my first attempt to bake in a dutch oven. While I was transferring the dough, I kept reminding myself "Don't burn the fingers"! I'm gonna to try more recipe in the "Tartine Bread".

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

I love this bread and am ready to graduate from a towel lined bowl to a proofing basket. I imagine any basket will be an improvement, but am curious what size basket you are using.

MTK's picture
MTK

I use  a round proofing basket. Its diameter is 20cm.

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

Do you think that is the "right" size for the nearly 1000 grams of dough the recipe calls for?

I was debating between 20cm or 22.9cm (8" or 9"). I do like the height you get, but then I think with the extra 2.54 centimeters in width I would get an extra slice or two of bread.

MTK's picture
MTK

Approximately. I forget how much flour I used in this dough. Maybe 800~900 grams of dough? I think dutch oven contributes to the height. I think either size of the basket is OK.