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Tartine Bread using Bosch Universal Plus

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kensbread01's picture
kensbread01

Tartine Bread using Bosch Universal Plus

Looking for suggestions.  So far, just about everything I've heard on this board has made my bread making better so just asking.

I  just purchased a Bosch Universal Plus and want to use it to make 1000 gms (two) loafs of bread tomorrow.  Previously, I have been doing only 500 gm recipes and now am ready to make two loafs.  I want to use my new mixer to mix the dough and perhaps do the bulk rise in the mixing bowl.  I'm using my microwave as a proofing oven with boiling water to keep warm every time I do a dough turn.   Just wonder how others may have adapted their procedures when using a mixer in the first stages.

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Hi Ken.

I can not comment on procedures using a mixer for the Tartine loaf as I never use one.  This bread is actually one of the easiest for mixing and kneading for the reason that there really is no kneading, but a series of stretch and folds.  My opinion is that a mixer is not necessary for this particular bread, and one might even get better results NOT using one.

I will be visiting Tartine this month...can't wait!

Good luck and please do post your results.  This bread is one of my faves.

John

holds99's picture
holds99

Here's a link to Chad Robertson's Master Class demonstration, where he explains and shows how he makes Tartine bread. If you haven't seen it before it's worth watching:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIIjV6s-0cA

Best of luck with your Tartine loaf.

Howard

kensbread01's picture
kensbread01

I watched the video and it was great.  Having made probably a dozen loaves of bread using the Tartine procedures, he makes it look so simple and actually it is not too bad if you follow the instructions he lays out.  I noticed he did not use preheated baking vessels like he suggests in his book.   Also noticed that he says he normally uses a mechanical mixer in the first mixing stage but obviously did not have one for the class.  I plan to use mine to mix at low speed to combine the dough.  Let rest, then mix again when time to add salt.   One does not need to use a mixer at all for this recipe but I've got one now and want to try it out.  I might even add a little more water, perhaps go to 79% hydration since I am planning to use 100 gms of rye and 100 gms whole wheat, and 800 gms of KA bread flour.

holds99's picture
holds99

I use a DLX stand mixer for nearly all my dough.  I usually make approximately 8 lbs. of dough at a time.  After my overnight levain, which is approx. 25% of the final dough mix, Except for the salt, I combine the ingredients for final dough mix: water, flour and levain (hold out the salt).  Then, mix the dough for a minute of two, just enough to get the mixture into a shaggy mass.  At this poiint shut off the the mixer, cover the top of the mixer bowl and allow the dough to autolyse (rest) for 30 minutes in order to absorb the water in the mix.  After the autolyse turn your mixer back on medium/low and mix for a couple of minutes before adding the salt.  Sprinker the salt over the dough mix and continue mixing on medium for another 8-10 minutes. 

After mixing, I transfer the final dough from the mixer bowl to a plastic tub, large enough to be able to easily turn the dough (using Robertsons method) at 20-30 minute intervals. I usually give the final dough an initial turn plus 3-4 more turns, which takes anywhere from an hour to two hours.  I don't really do a bulk fermentation per se, rather I go from the final iteration of turning the dough to dividing and pre-shaping.  I allow the pre-shaped loaves to rest 30 minutes, covered, then I do my final shaping.  Incidentally, I usually keep my hydration at around 70-75% depending on the type flour I'm using.  As you indicated, rye and whole wheat that have normal amounts of bran will absorb more water than extracted flour.  It comes down to feel, being able to touch the final dough mix and know whether it feels right in terms of hydration, or whether it needs adjustment.

Howard

 

kensbread01's picture
kensbread01

You say you go another 8-10 minutes on medium speed.  I wonder why?  Does this help build gluten?  Any particular reason?

holds99's picture
holds99

I the DLX is unlike most other mixers, inasmuch as the bowl turns and there really isn't a dough hook per se.  Instead there's a bar that stands up in the center of the bowl and a paddle scraper that cleans the bowl as it rotates, along the side of the bowl.   The DLX bowl is a 10 quart bowl.  The DLX mixes about as close to hand mixing as you can get with a home stand type mixer.  Anyway, it's a slow mix, even on medium.  I let the DLX do the initial mixing, then move the dough to a tub and do the hand stretching and folding.  The bottom line is a baker can do all the mixing by hand, which I have done on many occasions where I'm making a small batch of dough.  Anyway, I just use the mixer to do the initial mix.  Keep in mind I'm nearly always mixing 8 lb. or more dough.  Anyway, as far as mixing goes, the best bet is to judge by the way the dough is developing, whether of not it is firming up properly: has elasticity and is extensible. 

Here's a link to a recent TFL blog I posted, which explains the procedure I use.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/35341/dutch-oven-baking-atta-durum-flour-and-ka-bread-flour

Howard

Howard

kensbread01's picture
kensbread01

These shots are from the last bread I made using Tartine method with some added flavor using walnuts, prunes, roasted pumpkin seeds, and apricots.  Delicious!

holds99's picture
holds99

Nice job.  The fruits and nuts are a great idea.

Howard