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substitute for dry milk (powdered milk)

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NanusT's picture
NanusT

substitute for dry milk (powdered milk)

Hi all and happy holidays!

I want to bake simple rolls which call for 3 tsp of dry milk (0.9 oz). I don’t have dry milk at hand and in the stores it comes only in big packages which I don’t need because I never use it.

So my question is how can I substitute it?

 

Thanks a lot

Tal

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

If it's only 3 tsps. I would just simply leave it out.

suave's picture
suave

0.9 oz of dry milk is not nothing

Donkey_hot's picture
Donkey_hot

Tal, according to a conversion chart, 3 teaspoon of dry milk is 0.15 oz by weight, and 3 tablespoon is 0.45 oz.  If your recipe really calls for 0.9 oz of powdered dry milk, the correct amount by volume would be 6 tablespoon.    If you finalize on exact volume or weight you need to use, we could tell you an exact amount of fresh milk you can substitute it with.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I'd just use replace a bit of the water in the recipe with milk and not worry about it.

Bob S.'s picture
Bob S.

You could substitute dry buttermilk, such as cultured Buttermilk Blend from SACO Foods. It comes in a 12 oz. canister. Another possibility is malted milk powder, which usually comes in a 13 oz. canister.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

in the recipe, replace with milk and be ready to add 3% to 10% of that water weight if the dough looks too dry.  

Example:  replacing 500g water with milk, add one table spoon (15g) to 3 tablespoons (45g -50g) more milk to get the right consistency.  (or to simplify... about 2 tsp more milk per cup of water in the recipe.)

 

NanusT's picture
NanusT

Donkey hot, I'm taking the recipe from Jeffrey Hamelman's book. The recipe is calling for: 0.9 oz (3 tablespoons) dry milk (powdered milk), so it was my mistake with the tea spoon I mentioned.

So in how much milk should I substitute it?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

how many grams is listed for the powdered milk?

multiply by ten to get what would be the liquid milk amount, then subtract from the total water to know how much water is needed.  

oz.  0.9 oz x 10 = 9oz    H2O oz - 9oz Milk = H2O oz    

Where do I get 10 from?  Powdered milk is about 10% milk solids,  take any weight of powdered milk and multiply by 10 put into a container and add water until you come to that weight.  10g of pwd milk --> add enough water to make 100g. 

Donkey_hot's picture
Donkey_hot

Tal, to make it very simple, easy, and painless, (assuming that you are measuring by volume and your "one cup" is 240mg+) just take 1cup of total water and replace it with milk.  I suggest that you should scald and cool your milk first(yes, even if it is pasteurized) and take your measurements after if becomes lukewarm(it will evaporate some, so start with more).     Happy baking!

NanusT's picture
NanusT

Why should I scald the milk? 

Donkey_hot's picture
Donkey_hot

You don't have to, but it gives  better results.   Bakers use "baker's dry milk" that is already high heat treated.  All you'd like to know on  denaturing of proteins and how it improves the rise of bread is available to read in various books and on-line.

 

NanusT's picture
NanusT

Didn't know it, ill try it!

NanusT's picture
NanusT

There is no milk in the recipe.

All the liquids in the recipe are:

8.1 oz water, 1 egg, 1.4 oz butter and 0.9 oz (3 tablespoons) dry milk

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

sub out the water for milk    ...but then add two teaspoons more milk (my tip)    easy peasy

oh, and, think seriously about scalding the milk (until the edges are starting to foam) and letting it cool first before measuring.

 

Bob S.'s picture
Bob S.

Since whole milk is 87% water, you could substitute 9.3 oz. of whole milk to get the same amount of moisture in your recipe (8.1/0.87=9.3). This will give you 1.2 ounces of milk solids, which is somewhat richer than the original formula. Using 9 oz. of skim milk would probably get you close to the original recipe.

suave's picture
suave

8.1 oz water + 0.9 oz of dry milk = 9.0 oz of whole milk

The recipe looks like it was converted from liquid milk to dry.  BTW, Walmart sells 3-packs of 3.2 oz bags of dry milk for $2 or so.

NanusT's picture
NanusT

:)