The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Whey: How to use it and why

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

Whey: How to use it and why

There has been discussion of whey in baking German bread so herewith are the results of some of my researches on the topic.

1-How to use dry whey for baking:

-Whey is heavy in protein and so has a tendency to toughen the texture of baked goods, so you may need to adjust your recipe accordingly.

-Don't over mix- add whey to the other dry ingredients in your recipe before blending with the wet ingrdeients.  Once combined, mix batter just long enough to ensure that the dry ingrdients have been moistened by the wet ingredients.

-Replace all-purpose flour with equal amounts of pastry flour.  For a more healthful twist, try using whole wheat pastry flour

-Add about 10% more vegatable oil, butter or margarine to the recipe.  These fats tenderize the batter and will help to counteract any toughness or chewiness that adding extra protein to the recipe may cause

-Start off with 1/2 cup of whey and add more if desired

-Note the high protein content of whey may promote more rapid browning in baked goods.  Monitor the last few minutes of baking time for browning and adjust as needed.

2-Results of use of whey:

It should make for great color and a creamy flavor.

Hope this helps.

arifainchtein's picture
arifainchtein

I make both cheese and bread and your posting made me think. What about making bread with the liquid whey left over from the cheese making process? Have you tried that? I might experiment this weekend but would love to know if anybody has done it. On the other hand, any particular tricks on drying whey?

noa's picture
noa

I've used fresh whey in bread, and liked the results. Try substituting 1/3-1/2 the liquid in the recipe for whey and see what you think.

As for not over mixing, that probably applies to quick breads; yeast breads will need their usual mixing/kneading.

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

I've used the whey left over from making cheese or bean curd as the liquid for my dough in a straight 1:1 substitution for the amount of water called for. The dough rises slightly faster with whey as opposed to plain water, so it must contain nutrients that yeast likes. It makes little difference whether the whey was from milk or soy beans.

If I'm not going to use the whey for bread dough within 1 or 2 days, I freeze it.

rudolf's picture
rudolf

Now hold up a minute countryboy, let me get this straight, You mean WHEY? the clear liquid from milk when the curds have been removed from it to make either butter, cheese or yoghurts. Now if we are both talking about the same whey How can it be HIGH in protein when all the protein has been removed. What do you get when you dry whey once all the solids have been taken out, I would suggest you will end up with nothing. From the less scientifically advanced United Kingdom i would truly like to see this wonder of modern US technology, or is it just US bullshit?

JMonkey's picture
JMonkey

Now if we are both talking about the same whey How can it be HIGH in protein when all the protein has been removed.
Whey is, in fact, high in protein and has a wide variety of uses, from animal feed to sports energy products. Here's one reference. And here's another.

And that's just a couple of hits off the front page of a quick Google search on "whey."
iamnicogomez's picture
iamnicogomez

Hello everyone.

I've become very interested in this subject. Whey contains a varying amount protein depending on how you develop curds (or caseins, the dominant proteins in milk). Normally whey does not contain very much protein (and usually consist of only ß-Lactoglobulin and a-Lactalbumin). The first reference you gave (Wikipedia) even gives numbers: 0.846 g protein per 100 g of whey fluid. This means whey contains an insignificant amount of protein (a mere 0.8%!) whereas acid and enzyme-made cheeses such as cottage cheese and mozzarella cheese can be anywhere from 20-30% protein, again, in the form of casein proteins.

Supplementing dough with liquid whey will add protein, but an UDDERly (haha) insignificant amount. The perks of adding whey, however, are due to other nutrients it contains such as calcium and lactose. While calcium phosphate, the salt that is involved in clumping casein micelles (or little cell-like blobs), is almost entirely associated with casein in milk, acid coagulation to develop curds (in the case of mozzarella cheese) increases the solubility of the salt so that it assumes an aqueous state. This means whey contains a considerable amount of calcium (and its oppositely charged ion lover phosphorous). Lastly, whey contains a hefty helping of lactose, or milk sugar. It will certainly add a subtly sweet flavor to your bread, but, and here's the interesting part, it will not help yeast leaven the dough. This is because yeast fungus, unlike the bacteria used to make yogurt, does not make the protein called lactase with which lactose sugar can be broken down into glucose and galactose. Besides tweaking flavor, lactose is also well known to add to the color and texture of bread, especially of the crust. The reason for this is probably not well documented but my best guess is that simple sugars such as lactose melt and crystalize in the crust similarly to flamed confectioner's sugar glaze atop a masterfully prepared crème brûlée.

Adios!

Nico G.

archfarmer's picture
archfarmer

FYI: There are two types of protien in milk; curds, or cassien, and whey. Cassien aka "curds" manifest itself as a solid during cheesemaking and whey as a liquid.


There are various other types of protiens in milk

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

I just finished baking four loaves of rye bread with the addition of 1/2 cup of whey and found that the crumb is definitely smoother than without whey.  In my next round I will probably use 1 full cup of whey for 4 loaves of rye bread.

 FYI:   Since denatured whey proteins exhibit good water-binding properties, they can be used in whole-grain bakery goods to control water management and prevent accelerated staling. Gumminess problems associated with the use of high levels of soluble fiber in some types of whole grains can be resolved with the addition of whey proteins.

Umbagog's picture
Umbagog

   I have some lactobacillus bulgaricus which I mix with whole milk.  After a day or two I pour off the liquid (whey) and then strain the rest.  I then rinse the bulgars, add milk, and start over again.

   I have tried using the whey in a lot of the food I cook, because it's too rich to throw away.  Several weeks ago I began mixing some into my bread dough.  First it was a half cup, and gradually I have upped it to the point that I now use it instead of water in baking my bread. 

  Each time I have used it for bread, the results have been just plain good.  There is something in that stuff which is complementary to the other ingredients, I think.

  

rudolf's picture
rudolf

Remember folks, On the internet a lie is half way around the world before the truth has even got its boots on, I know the age of enlightenment is rapidly coming to an end, lets not hasten it's demise by posting spurious or ill thought out 'Facts'

rudolf's picture
rudolf

I would suggest that whey is not as high in protein as ordinary milk from which it derives, So in that regard it is relatively low in protein

archfarmer's picture
archfarmer

Whey makes up approximately 20% of the protiens in milk

rudolf's picture
rudolf

I really think there is some confusion here, There is liquid whey and there is whey CONCENTRATE, this is a powder and since it is concentrated it is high in protein, however this does not apply to liquid whey which has less protein than milk

browndog's picture
browndog

Rudolf, you might have more luck with a more politic style. This is a low-confrontation forum generally. I don't think differences in opinion are discouraged if they're respectfully presented.

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Rudolf,

I'm glad to see you answered the first question you asked about dried whey.  Apparently you are well-acquainted with the stuff but happen to know it as whey concentrate, rather than as dried whey.  And, as you and CountryBoy have both noted, it is high in protein, despite some of the protein having been extracted from the fluid milk in the form of cheese or yogurt.  So, no B.S., no lies, no other issues at play here. 

Keep the posts coming and keep in mind that things sometimes have different labels in different places (e.g., spanner/wrench, tube/subway, windscreen/windshield, etc.).  PMcCool

rudolf's picture
rudolf

I would just like to point it for the last time that it is not logical for liquid whey to be higher in protein than the milk from which it derives, logically speaking the protein content of whey falls somewhere between that of milk and that of water, High in protein? No, everything is relative, whey cannot be higher in protein than the milk from which it derives, and since all the fatty content has fallen out of suspension, coagulated and removed, it must be considerably less

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Rudolf,

I think that I finally see the source of confusion.  If you re-read CountryBoy's original post, it has a large, bold header that mentions Dry Whey (whey concentrate, to you).  Everything that follows is in the context of dry whey, not fluid whey.  My guess is that when he uses the word whey, intending it to be understood as dry whey, you are reading it literally and understanding it to mean fluid whey. 

Try reading CountryBoy's post again.  This time, whenever you see the word whey, mentally substitute "dry whey" or "whey concentrate".  Then I think you will probably find yourself agreeing with everything he says.

Your point that fluid whey is lower in protein than the milk from which it derives is correct.  As was your (and CountryBoy's) earlier posts that dry whey/whey concentrate is high in protein.

PMcCool

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

You are of course correct and thank you for your clarification.  When I made my comments they were indeed under the heading of: 1-How to use dry whey for baking.

Dry whey can be found in the US in pharmacies and health food stores.

 

 

archfarmer's picture
archfarmer

Whey makes up only one of the protiens in milk, so on its own it's not higher in protien than the milk it's derived from

rudolf's picture
rudolf

Thank you one and all. Yes I see we all have been the victims of a misconception, myself most of all. My endeavour was to clarify as some misconceptions gain credence and are perpetuated.,  Thanks all for your comments and I feel somewhat humbled. Will try to modify my adversarial stance in future comments, Anyway I still read all the posts and I love the site.

Rudolf